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anonymous

  • one year ago

Lara tossed a fair coin 3 times. What is the probability of getting heads in the first two trials? 1 over 8 2 over 8 3 over 8 4 over 8 will fan and medal

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  1. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Okay, this might not make sense NOW, but it will later. Independent events are events that don't influence one another, and the probability of both happening is simply the product of their respective probabilities.

  2. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    There, I said it

  3. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Now let's begin. with just one coin toss, what's the probability of getting heads? :D

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    um idk

  5. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Really? C'mon, at least give it a guess :)

  6. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    If it's easier to understand, what are the chances that you get heads with one toss?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i honestly do not know

  8. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Half. Fifty percent. 1/2 ^^

  9. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Now, the second coin toss would be the same, half or 50% chance of getting heads, yes?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  11. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Are the first and second coin tosses independent of each other?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no..?

  13. rational
    • one year ago
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    coins dont have memory

  14. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    in other words... does the result of the second coin toss depend on the result of the first one?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    idk

  17. rational
    • one year ago
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    as if the coin remembers what happened in the previous toss and change its mind to flip the other side in next toss that can never happen

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can i just get the answer

  19. rational
    • one year ago
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    if you just blindly guess the answer, you will get it correct with a probability of 1/4 because there are 4 options

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is the answer 2/8 ?

  21. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Which is a coincidence XD

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so 2/8 is the answer?

  23. rational
    • one year ago
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    Haha your luck is at its best today!

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yay lol

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you help me with some more problems

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ?

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{2}{8}?\]

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{1}{2}\times \frac{1}{2}=\frac{1}{4}\] which is in fact \(\frac{2}{8}\) but not what you want as a final answer

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so does anybody know the answer

  31. rational
    • one year ago
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    2/8 is correct

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    At a game booth, a student gets a box of candy as the prize for winning a game. The boxes come in four colors: white, red, green, and blue. There are 10 boxes of each color. All the boxes are equally likely to be given away as prizes. Which expression shows the probability of the first winner receiving a white box and the second winner also receiving a box of the same color? 10 over 40 multiplied by 9 over 39 10 over 40 multiplied by 10 over 39 10 over 40 plus 9 over 39 10 over 40 plus 10 over 39

  33. rational
    • one year ago
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    Alright, read the question and see if you can tell me what we need to find out exactly

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2/8 is silly

  35. rational
    • one year ago
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    Haha not more sillier than 200/800 I think the teacher wants the kids to solve it by listing out all the possibilities and pick the favorable ones

  36. rational
    • one year ago
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    rational numbers trip all kids in the start because they have infinitely many representations : (2, 8) = (1, 4) = (4, 16) = ...

  37. ikram002p
    • one year ago
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    thats why i hate them :)

  38. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    hehe forgetting all sentimental attachment to certain box colours, the colour of the candy boxes given away to separate winners don't affect each other, right? IE... they're indpendent? ;)

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok

  40. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Okay, so this is a bit of a stretch, so I'm going to lay it out for you. In general, probability is: number of desirable outcomes divided by total number of possible outcomes. With forty boxes and ten white boxes, what's the probability of getting a white box?

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    idk

  42. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    \[\Large \frac{\text{number of desired outcomes}}{\text{total number of outcomes}}\] how about now?

  43. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    still dont know

  44. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Give it your best guess? I bet the choices give you some kind of clue ^^

  45. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Why don't we try process elimination? C and D seem silly.

  46. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    lol yes, let's :D My professors were evil with these multiple choice questions, having the correct answer and the deceptively similar common mistakes among the choices o.O

  47. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Lmao. ^-^

  48. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Skielerlucas04 are you still mad at me

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