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Photon336

  • one year ago

A graduate student adds 100J of energy to a sample of ethanol at a temperature below the boiling point. The addition of energy causes no change in temperature. What explains this observation. A more energy necessary to change temp B the sample is at the melting point C the bond energies are all greater than 100 J so the bonds could be broken. D the energy dissipates as friction.

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  1. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I feel like it's between A/D

  2. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    I'm thinking this one could be A

  3. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    C doesn't make sense as it says bonds are broken normally when the bond breaks energy is released in the form of heat so it should change the temperature

  4. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Sample is at it's melting point? that doesn't even apply because ethanol is a liquid at RT.

  5. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Why are you thinking D?

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    no... wait... it's below the boiling point. maybe that energy was not enough to cause a change in temperature... yeah.. friction? maybe don't know considering collisions aren't elastic some of that energy would be lost to friction. wasn't sure.. I think A makes more sense.

  7. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    but if D.. were the case that would always be the case..

  8. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Friction normally causes some sort of heat to form thus changing the temperature doesn't it

  9. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    explain that? energy is lost to friction so wouldn't that not raise the temperature by that much?

  10. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    Is it A?

  11. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    The question itself says the answer right?

  12. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    tara

  13. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Normally when it hits the boiling point it's changing phases so then it would require a change in temperature but in order for it to change phases you need the energy to overcome the forces involved so if it didn't have enough energy the temperature wouldn't have changed

  14. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    ... it's B..

  15. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    let me write the explanation

  16. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    "the only time you add energy to a sample and have the temperature remain constant is when there is a phase change. the problem states that ethanol is at a temperature below its boiling point, the only other phase transition would be melting"

  17. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    to me this was a bad way of testing this concept.. because first of all ethanol is a liquid at room temperature.. and it's at a temperature below the boiling point. okay yeah like I knew that phase transitions were an (equlibirum process) where the temperature remains relatively constant.

  18. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    but the way they asked it was just dumb to me...

  19. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    It doesn't say specifically at room temperature so that's why it wouldn't nessicarilly be a liquid and this question definitely could have been asked better

  20. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    yeah.. true.. I guess i shouldn't have assumed that.. but to me this is stupid because melting implies that it's a solid.. I guess we were supposed to assume that..

  21. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I will post more.

  22. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    I like how we are told in classes to make assumptions so we automatically get trained to assume parts of questions and that ruins it in some questions

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