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Lilmike234

  • one year ago

What is the equation of an ellipse centered at (5,-1) having a horizontal minor axis of length 4 and a major axis of length 6?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    do you know the general form of an ellipse with center \((h,k)\)?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    just asking is all if the answer is "NO" i will show you

  3. lilmike234
    • one year ago
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    No I don't

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no one likes these conic section problems but they are not that hard

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    general form of ellipse with center \((h,k)\) is \[\frac{(x-h)^2}{a^2}+\frac{(y-k)^2}{b^2}=1\] you are already given \((h,k)\) all you need now is \(a\) and \(b\)

  6. lilmike234
    • one year ago
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    (x-5)^2/36+(y-1)^2/16=1 was the equation I got is this correct ?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    could be let me check

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no but you have the right idea

  9. lilmike234
    • one year ago
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    Or was is suppose to be (x+5)^2/9+(y+1)^2/4=1 ?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    first off "horizontal minor axis" is shorter than the "vertical major axis" that means it looks like this |dw:1439255560209:dw|

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    second answer is even closer, you got the deominators right, but they are backwards

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    half of 6 is 3 and \(3^2=9\) likewise \(2^2=4\) but since it is oriented the other way, the larger number should be under the \(y\) term not the x terms

  13. lilmike234
    • one year ago
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    So (x-5)^2/9+(y-1)^2/4=1?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    looks like this http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=ellipse+%28x-5%29^2%2F4%2B%28y%2B1%29^2%2F9%3D1

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    again the larger number should be under the \(y\) term since the major axis is vertical

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{(x-5)^2}{4}+\frac{(y+1)^2}{9}=1\]

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