anonymous
  • anonymous
Let's go over the foundation of atom and its structure!
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Version#2
ali2x2
  • ali2x2
?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yay

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

ali2x2
  • ali2x2
ayy
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'll also post the link for version 1
anonymous
  • anonymous
Great! Now we are into electronegativity folks! And how electronegativity of different elements induce different levels of attraction in covalent bonding!
anonymous
  • anonymous
And how the resulting shape (for example tetrahedral/linear) determines whether its polar or non polar compoundXD
anonymous
  • anonymous
Just to recap people here know covalent bonding stabilizes the participating elements.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Convalent bonding is different from ionic bonding in that they "share" their properties as opposed to exchanging electrons.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Which is the case in ionic bonding.
ali2x2
  • ali2x2
Ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
@ganeshie8 Version 2 foundation of atom and its structure has been posted
anonymous
  • anonymous
Every element has an assigned electronegativity. This electronegativity, when bonded, determines the direction of "polarity" dependent on the extent of electronegativity.
anonymous
  • anonymous
For example, take the water molecule
anonymous
  • anonymous
Despite having two identical bonds in a V shaped manner, the difference of electronegativity between hydrogen molecule and oxygen molecule are slightly directed off to the side, hence making the water polar with dipole dipole attraction.
anonymous
  • anonymous
This further serves to explain why water drops are not power like.
anonymous
  • anonymous
interesting, another new thing I learned
anonymous
  • anonymous
δ- symbol for electronegativity
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh by the way we should cover isotopes here too.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Who here knows what isotopes are?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Isotopes indeed differ in the number of neutrons present. However protons don't change so they find the same spot in our periodic table.
anonymous
  • anonymous
However drop or rise in the number of neutrons also affects electron configuration as well.
anonymous
  • anonymous
what are isotopes?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Isotopes are different versions of the same element.
anonymous
  • anonymous
For example 99% of carbons in our atmosphere are carbon-12
anonymous
  • anonymous
but there are radioactive carbons like carbon-14.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Mind you, they have the same number of protons, but it's just that they have different number of neutrons.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Now I get it, yay :)

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.