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anonymous

  • one year ago

Let's go over the foundation of atom and its structure!

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Version#2

  2. ali2x2
    • one year ago
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    ?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yay

  4. ali2x2
    • one year ago
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    ayy

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'll also post the link for version 1

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Great! Now we are into electronegativity folks! And how electronegativity of different elements induce different levels of attraction in covalent bonding!

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    For version 1: http://openstudy.com/study#/updates/55ca2191e4b0c5fe980533aa

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    And how the resulting shape (for example tetrahedral/linear) determines whether its polar or non polar compoundXD

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Just to recap people here know covalent bonding stabilizes the participating elements.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Convalent bonding is different from ionic bonding in that they "share" their properties as opposed to exchanging electrons.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Which is the case in ionic bonding.

  12. ali2x2
    • one year ago
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    Ok

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @ganeshie8 Version 2 foundation of atom and its structure has been posted

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Every element has an assigned electronegativity. This electronegativity, when bonded, determines the direction of "polarity" dependent on the extent of electronegativity.

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    For example, take the water molecule

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Despite having two identical bonds in a V shaped manner, the difference of electronegativity between hydrogen molecule and oxygen molecule are slightly directed off to the side, hence making the water polar with dipole dipole attraction.

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    This further serves to explain why water drops are not power like.

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    interesting, another new thing I learned

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    δ- symbol for electronegativity

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh by the way we should cover isotopes here too.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Who here knows what isotopes are?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Isotopes indeed differ in the number of neutrons present. However protons don't change so they find the same spot in our periodic table.

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    However drop or rise in the number of neutrons also affects electron configuration as well.

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what are isotopes?

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Isotopes are different versions of the same element.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    For example 99% of carbons in our atmosphere are carbon-12

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    but there are radioactive carbons like carbon-14.

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Mind you, they have the same number of protons, but it's just that they have different number of neutrons.

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Now I get it, yay :)

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