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anonymous

  • one year ago

help!

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @jtvatsim

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Which ratio best defines experimental probability? Number of times an event occurs:Total number of times the activity is performed Total number of times the activity is performed:Number of times an event occurs Number of nonfavorable outcomes:Number of possible outcomes Number of possible outcomes:Number of nonfavorable outcomes

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @jtvatsim

  4. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Well I don't know how really to explain this without giving a direct answer...but http://www.mathgoodies.com/glossary/term.asp?term=experimental%20probability that should probably help you out

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @jtvatsim what is it?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    B?

  7. jtvatsim
    • one year ago
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    Close, other way around. It's the number of times occurs to the total times.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A?

  9. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes, it was actually in the link

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wait is it A or B?

  11. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    "Experimental probability is the ratio of the number of times an event occurs to the total number of trials or times the activity is performed."

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so B? @Astrophysics

  13. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    C'mon man just read the sentence..

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A

  15. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thanks :) sorry by the way, lol

  17. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    It's cool

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Astrophysics

  20. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    This one should be pretty straight forward you want to find the amount of white beads in a total of 1000, so what is the original ratio out of a 100?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    um, i dont get it

  22. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    You're just suppose to multiply the original ratio by 1000

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    whats the original ratio?

  24. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Read your question and tell me what you think

  25. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    It's not difficult see if you can figure it out first, out of a 100 trials how many times was white pulled out, just read the boxes.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    270?

  27. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes, that's it! Because the original you have 27/100 multiply that by 1000 you get 270 :-)

  28. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    That's all to it, not so hard right?

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    nopoe :)

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Astrophysics

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