anonymous
  • anonymous
Which lines in this poem indicate that the poetic speaker refuses to be beguiled by love any longer? Farewell Love by Sir Thomas Wyatt Farewell, Love, and all thy laws for ever: Thy baited hooks shall tangle me no more. Senec and Plato call me from thy lore, To perfect wealth my wit for to endeavour. In blind error when I did persever, Thy sharp repulse, that wingspaneth aye so sore, Hath taught me to set in trifles no store, And scape forth, since liberty is lever. Therefore farewell, go trouble younger hearts, And in me claim no more authority; With idle youth go use thy property
English
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
With idle youth go use thy property, And thereon spend thy many brittle darts. For, hitherto though I've lost my time, Me lusteth no longer rotten boughs to climb
anonymous
  • anonymous
Options: Thy baited hooks shall tangle me no more. Senec and Plato call me from thy lore, In blind error when I did persever, Hath taught me to set in trifles no store, Therefore farewell, go trouble younger hearts And thereon spend thy many brittle darts. Me lusteth no longer rotten boughs to climb This is the last question btw
anonymous
  • anonymous
@LunyMoony (I have to retake a test so some I may have already asked.)

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LunyMoony
  • LunyMoony
This poem is written correctly and he starts it out by saying, "Farewell, Love, and all thy laws for ever:" ....which indicates that he is done with love forever and sets the tone for the rest of the poem I believe.
anonymous
  • anonymous
It's not one of the options I can pick ): I can only choose Thy baited hooks shall tangle me no more. Senec and Plato call me from thy lore, In blind error when I did persever, Hath taught me to set in trifles no store, Therefore farewell, go trouble younger hearts And thereon spend thy many brittle darts. Me lusteth no longer rotten boughs to climb
anonymous
  • anonymous
Would it be "Thy baited hooks..." ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
LunyMoony
  • LunyMoony
No, I'm not sold on that, but you do what you think best :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well out of the options which would you say? :b
LunyMoony
  • LunyMoony
Still the one I said, "Farewell, Love, and all thy laws for ever:"
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well I can't pick that one, it won't let me so I guess I'll go with baited hooks $:
LunyMoony
  • LunyMoony
Ok! Awesome!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay, can you help with one to two more? That's all I have left
LunyMoony
  • LunyMoony
Yep
anonymous
  • anonymous
Did you ever figure out the answer to this question?
anonymous
  • anonymous
No :/

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