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anonymous

  • one year ago

Is tension force equivalent to applied force?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So let's say there is a tension force of 360N acting on a 30kg object on a flat surface with no friction. Acceleration can be calculated using the newton's second law F=ma such that 360N=30kg(a) a=12/s^2

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @IrishBoy123

  3. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    if the object is being pulled by a rope, then the force on the object and the tension in the rope are one and the same, yes with our usual assumption that the rope is massless

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The rope is indeed not very massless but I hope physicists are smart enough to account for everything elseXD

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    we assume the rope is massless so the problem will be easier

  6. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Question: Where is gravity?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i forget why it is easier to assume rope is massless

  8. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    flat surface and frictionless

  9. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    The problem indicates to tension and friction, but gravity is there still.

  10. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    ah, yes, but it is acting orthogonal to motion so indeed you would have R = mg in the up down direction equalling zero

  11. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1439468269722:dw|

  12. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    if the rope is not massless then the tension is greater the further away from the block you are pulling because that part of the rope is pulling the block and the rest of the rope in addition you will have a force downwards on the rope - gravity

  13. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Because no friction, so that the box moves with constant velocity and total force is as shown.

  14. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Actually, I don't know, hehehe... I forgot all of my physics knowledge. @IrishBoy123 rely on you. :)

  15. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1439468440385:dw|

  16. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    @Loser66 if you are ever relying on me, you are in such trouble :-)) lol!!

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @IrishBoy123 so my answer turns out wrong.

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I seem to have neglected the gravity... He says this

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Fnet = ma Ft – Fg = ma 360 – m g = m a 360 – 30 x9.8 = 30 a a= 2.2 or 2 m/s2 upward

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So the unbalanced force was 360 N as you all know it, Mass of the object being moved was 120kg gravity is 9.8m/s^2 Surface is frictionless Force of tension=360N which @IrishBoy123 had claimed as being equivalent to applied force to the object with a mass of 120kg

  21. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    not sure which we are now discussing can you draw it?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1439472031159:dw|

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry basically 30kg object being applied 360N tension force acceleration of which is being looked for.

  24. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1439472054470:dw|

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But this is wrong ?

  27. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    cool. here the surface is horizontal and frictionless, so we don't have to worry about gravity

  28. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    if the drawing is accurate, the solution is correct can you post the question or link it?

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You have neglected gravity which acts downward.

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Fnet = ma Ft – Fg = ma 360 – m g = m a 360 – 30 x9.8 = 30 a a= 2.2 or 2 m/s2 upward

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    *quoted from my teacher.

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1439472226663:dw|this is tensile force which is also applied force

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    means the object is being pulled

  34. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    ok there is a context here which i am clearly missing i think you have this |dw:1439472256031:dw|

  35. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    but you mentioned a flat surface with no friction. that was the source of the confusion |dw:1439472446011:dw|

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    this force whether its tension or not is pretty irrelevant unless you are calculating deformation/stress/strain

  37. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    until we see the actual question or a good drawing, we are just guessing ..... and i am no good at that :p

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    "A mass of 30 kg is hauled upward by a rope. The tension in the rope is 360 N. What is the magnitude of the acceleration of the mass?"

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry it was my faulty @IrishBoy123

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I guess I was mixed up with some other questions which posed "frictionless surface"

  41. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    no worries ;-)

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