anonymous
  • anonymous
What is Fire??? (Which State does it belongs to?)
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
katieb
  • katieb
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arindameducationusc
  • arindameducationusc
@harishk Fire is a process in which substances combine chemically with oxygen from the air and typically give out bright light, heat, and smoke; combustion or burning. What is the state of matter of flame? Fire is an oxidizing chemical reaction that releases heat and light. The actual flames that you see moving and glowing when something is burning are simply gas that is still reacting and giving off light.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Also as there is abundance of oxygen the chemical reactions induced by fire is virally continuous so long as there are sufficient reactants
anonymous
  • anonymous
So you can see whenever fire can't burn there is a lack of chemical materials with which to burn them if any of them is missing

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anonymous
  • anonymous
I kind of heard somebody saying it is a Plasma matter... the 4th state of matter..
anonymous
  • anonymous
the flame can indeed be described as a low temperature plasma.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Define Plasma... in own words...
anonymous
  • anonymous
To give a rigorous definition of plasma (as you would find in textbooks) seems to be a bit above the level of discussion since it involved concepts like the debye length. Nevertheless in a fairly crude approximation, one can think of a plasma as a collection of ionized gas where a majority of the gas molecules have become ionized, which means their electrons have been stripped away, by some external (or internal) mechanism. The result is a free mixture of ions (positively charge nuclei of the gas molecules) and electrons. Macroscopically (viewed as a whole or viewed from far away), it is electrically neutral since the gas was (presumably) neutral before being ionized in the first place. Since charge is conserved in much the same way as mass is conserved, in non-relativistic classical mechanics, no additional charge is created or destroyed during the process of ionization. Locally however this can be far from the case as a small subregion of the plasma can have potentially more positive or negative charge and thus behave as such. Again though, this is looking more towards a proper definition as opposed to a general description so I will move onwards. With that rough overview out of the way, to the problem at hand! Fire is as the others correctly noted the visible radiations of an exothermic chemical reaction where products are oxidized and reduced. However the fire itself is not a plasma as one would usually consider. The reason for this is that most of the light that is given off is from hot ash or cinders that are too small to individually distinguish and yet glow from the heat of the reaction which just produced them. This means a majority of what we think of when we view “fire” is just radiated photons and not an ionized admixture of ions and electrons. These cinders ride convection currents away from the source, and as they expand outward (and upward here on earth (google candle burns in zero gravity video for an interesting treat)) and cool by radiating away their excess energy in the infared and visible light spectrum in order to reestablish thermal equilibrium with the environment. Thus to restate, it is this aspect of fire truly makes up a majority of what we see when we view a “fire.” However, very nearby the reaction process itself it is not uncommon to view the region surrounding it as a plasma. Indeed ions and electrons are abound; being separated, moving about, and recombining. If you view that video (I believe it is from NASA) it is a little easier to see this layer as the lack of gravity and low oxygen environment (coupled with a few other aspects of the experiment) allow one to see into this inner layer (in part) of the “plasma” around the wick. Again though, take what you see with a grain of salt since there is still a contribution (no doubt still sizable) of radiation and thermal equilibration of the combustion products. Hope I didn’t bore and that you find this helpful and it spurs your curiosity to learn more :D.
anonymous
  • anonymous
since the name @PlasmaFuzer iam pretty sure it got that right over plasma.. and as according to you, plasma is actually a state of ionized gas, which is not light.. right...???
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry I have been busy these last few days, and haven't had a chance to reply. Yes plasma is not light. Light consists of photons that can be given off by many different phenomenon. If you observe plasma in nature or on earth, it will usually be emitting a lot of light. This is because plasma is not the preferred (read lowest energy) state in which matter exists. To create a plasma, it takes input energy of some form to produce an ionization of the material (usually a gas of but not always.... google solid state plasma if curious); however even with input energy the atoms within the plasma don't just become ionized and stay that way. There is a continual process of electrons being knocked off of neutral atoms and recombining with ions and vice versa (both seeking at all times to lower their respective energy's) throughout the plasma. However this continuous cycle of ionizing and recombining generates lots and lots of photons which correspond to the energy required for an electron to neutralize an atom. Put simply, when an electron with just the right value of energy strikes the ion the excess kinetic energy the photon had is given up as an emitted photon. This photon's wavelength is tied very simply to this energy difference as follows: \[(free\ electron\ energy)-(bound\ electron\ energy)=\Delta E=h \nu = \frac{hc}{\lambda}\] Where delta E is the energy given up by the electron to neutralize the ion, h is Planck's constant, c the speed of light, and nu and lambda are the emitted photon's frequency and wavelength. Quite frequently, these can correspond to the frequency/wavelength of visible light and thus we can perceive them with our eyes, and if they are within the visible light spectrum then then frequency/wavelength will determine the color we perceive. Now I have only outlined one mechanism by which light can be generated by plasmas and I have broad stroked it ignoring some more subtle details, though I hinted at it since that "just right energy" for the electron comes down to quantum mechanics. So keep in mind that this is by no means the only way light can be generated here and the mechanism can often be very complicated. Nevertheless this is a common fairly straightforward process within plasma and is fairly easy to explain so hopefully its food for thought and drives you to want to read more about it. If you would like to read more about the specific way in which fire gives off light, and the color that light takes, then I direct you here: http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae569.cfm Note there is a difference between exciting electrons to higher energy levels and fully ionizing electrons. In plasmas, generally speaking, most atoms are ionized most of the time; whereas in fire, only a small portion of atoms are actually ionized the rest have just been excited by the energy of the chemical reaction. The radiation I mentioned in my previous post is generated by this process of electrons emitting photons in order to lower their energy and drop to a lower energy level. So again, this is why fire is not considered a plasma.

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