anonymous
  • anonymous
Describe in detail what you know about the enthalpy, entropy, and free energy changes when a sample of gas condenses to a liquid. How does temperature affect these changes?
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@taramgrant0543664
anonymous
  • anonymous
Canyou walk me through because I wanna understand it and not get the answer
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
Yes so ummm let's start with enthalpy so this is the thermodynamic potential H=U+pV is one of the formulas that correspond to enthalpy

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anonymous
  • anonymous
what do that formula mean
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
I was just about to put it lol so this formula is represented by the variables: H is the enthalpy of the system U is the internal energy of the system p is the pressure of the system V is the volume of the system. U is the value the is temperature dependent
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
dU=TdS-pdV
anonymous
  • anonymous
I swear it this look like encrypted codes or something
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
Maybe I'll try a different way: Enthalpy describes the change in energy of a system. In the case of water, the "system" is the water itself. At constant pressure, enthalpy refers to changes in heat. An exothermic processes involves a negative change in enthalpy, or a loss of heat. As water vapor condenses into liquid, it loses energy in the form of heat. Therefore, this process is exothermic.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok so what's free energy??
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
We will get to that because we need to talk about entropy first or free energy won't make much sense
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
Entropy is pretty much the amount of disorder In solids there is a low amount of disorder because in soilds there is a defined volume and shape In liquids the disorder increase because there is a define volume but no defined shape In gases chaos or disorder is high because the is no defined volume or shape the molecules are all over the place
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
So going from a gas to a liquid you're creating order because you're going from a gas that is is complete disorder to a liquid that has more order
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
So now there is free energy or Gibbs Free energy as it is also referred to as is the thermodynamic quantity equivalent to the capacity of a system to do work.
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
It is represented by the equation dG=dH-TdS d is those little triangle delta things that normally mean "change in" G is the free energy H is enthalpy T is temperature S is entropy
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
We know that dH is negative as heat is given off We also know dS is negative because it is going from a gas to a liquid
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
dS is negative dH is negative At low temperatures -TdS will be to small to overcome dH So dG will be negative At high temperatures -TdS will be big so dG will be positive
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
When ΔG is negative, a process or chemical reaction proceeds spontaneously in the forward direction. When ΔG is positive, the process proceeds spontaneously in reverse. When ΔG is zero, the process is already in equilibrium, with no net change taking place over time.
arindameducationusc
  • arindameducationusc
@taramgrant0543664 Awesome Explanation..
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can you explain free energy changes like you did enthalpy??

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