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ccswims

  • one year ago

WILL MEDAL Prove the Converse of the Pythagorean Theorem using similar triangles. The Converse of the Pythagorean Theorem states that when the sum of the squares of the lengths of the legs of the triangle equals the squared length of the hypotenuse, the triangle is a right triangle. Be sure to create and name the appropriate geometric figures.

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  1. ccswims
    • one year ago
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    @Hero can you help me?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @ccswims I can prove this one for you but I am sleepy so give me a shake and hug and I will help you

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ..........

  4. ccswims
    • one year ago
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    ? wait what do you mean?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok just type "Robert I need your help don't fokiing sleep and help me"

  6. ccswims
    • one year ago
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    Robert, I need your help, drink an energy drink if you have to but dont fall asleep on me

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok no problem

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    First off in proving this theory you need to construct squares above the triangle.

  9. ccswims
    • one year ago
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    ok, how?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok c^2=4(ab/2)+(a-b)^2=a^2+b^2

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1439587985138:dw|

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok that pattern continues for four times

  13. ccswims
    • one year ago
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    why the 4(ab/2)? like why times 4?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That figure represents the equation I just gave you

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You can see from the diagram above that 4 applies to how many triangles in that thing

  16. ccswims
    • one year ago
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    ohh, ok, so far I'm getting it. Whats next?

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That's it sister

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Draw a diagram that looks like a square that has 4 triangles in rotating manner and in the center lies the square.

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You can reason that when pythegoream theorem is shown with diagrams and that equation it precisely says that squares constructed above the triangles are exactly as described with that equation and as such it is proven!!

  20. ccswims
    • one year ago
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    ok, this wasn't as bad as I thought it was lol. Thanks!

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No problem! I am glad you picked something up from my brain

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