A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

Challenge Physics Problem: Electric Fields 3 point charges where q1=q3=5.00uC q2=-2.00uC and a=0.100m. Find the resultant force exerted on q3. u=micro First to get steps and answers correct gets fan & medal.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1439605074957:dw| q1 and q3 is positive while q2 is negative. Knows the steps and answers.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @Robert136 come here.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    One of the easier electric field problem btw.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    First chapter in electricity and magnetism course

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Great I'll get that rolling once I write a paragraph in a sec

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I gotta do write up for the inductance coil wire with use of ferromagnetism to control the traffic

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Might as well the fok do it here so we can share and argue about it

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sure you do

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1439605460241:dw| on the hypotenuse.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Forgot to say it is a right triangle.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1439605827422:dw| Forgot to add this.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The 2 legs are congruent.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Inductance have looping coil to detect the presence of metal materials which are mostly the constituents of vehicles. Change in the electromagnetic frequency above the coil installed beneath the ground makes this system quite an effective means to prevent traffic congestion from happening. Usually they are located underground up to a few meters from the stop line with respect to the green light so that turning off and on of the blue light and red light can be determined dependent on the traffic on adjacent roads. This technology has increased its use past a few years mainly due to the increased efficiency in increasing the flow of traffic as well as reducing unnecessary emission of gas to prevent gas from being released. This technology is a practical application of electromagnetism and will likely be used for the generations to come mainly due to the flexibility and cost effectiveness of operation associated with this technology.

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That's a rough write up for application of inductance on the traffic that work in collaboration with adjacent roads and intersecting traffic lights so that the congestion as well as frustration with unnecessary wait can be avoided.

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Pretty well written or do you suggest revision before submission to a course I am taking online?

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Prob misworded that first sentence I should have said inductance coil looping system

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Wow, that is a lot of unnecessary info. Was going to say lots of bull$#*@

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What do you think?

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What the fok bro

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Looks good for your resume.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I mean seriously be honest your turn to help me is strike me with honesty bro i did this in 2 minutes

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    trying to pull out items from my memory which is not so reliable

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but i think I have good trivial knowledge to deal with crap like this

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I am honest, bro

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so my writing good enough packed with information that you don't care

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Thanks for letting me know the physics behind this physics problem. You are great at teaching me physics!

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Learned a lot from your teaching. Too bad it went nowhere.

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What do you mean bro

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    this was my assignment

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and I did it so it's my turn to beat your wit in the problem you proposed

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No it is mine. My question is on this board.

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Go back to your nonsense board

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so we doing this challenge right

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Right on.

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    F=qvBsin) Lorentz force equation is at work

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Wrong already.

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Wait what are known values please elaborate

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the a,q1,q2,q3

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    from your question charges are known right I get it but hey your diagram looks like crap

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I thought it was a magnet bar

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Not telling you the concepts and unknown variables.

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No just 3 point charges. q1 and q3 are positive q2 is negative.

  43. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Hint: nothing to do with your inductance loop coil

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hehe

  45. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Alright I am totally onto this one

  46. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I thought you were head of Physics AMA

  47. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No I just had a verbal stifle with my brother.

  48. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    He got pissed at me for being told not to sit on his retricewatching TV and he nearly through his glass at me so I had to give him a lecture

  49. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    This is easiest electricity challenge problem I will post. Now can you help me with more in the future?

  50. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    threw*

  51. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Definitely my pleasure to help you in all respect

  52. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but a=0.1mm you are referring to acceleration correct?

  53. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Or did I prove myself a dork again

  54. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Why not give me a free lecture on my topic? ( I know how to solve it, but not much on electric fields) I asked for one. He threw glass at you and you gave him free lecture on what he needs?

  55. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No, it is m which is distance.

  56. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Alright I can give yo a free lecture no problem

  57. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I told him to fok off and if he does it again that I'd kill him

  58. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    he's such a punk

  59. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    on electric field only though. No inductance,current,resistance.

  60. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Alright as you know electric field is the field surrounding a charged particle right

  61. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no ohm, voltage, etc. Just motions in an electric field, electric field lines, electric field in a continuous charge distribution.

  62. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes.

  63. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Electric field only concerns with the amount of electrons

  64. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    on one significant other because protons are assumed

  65. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and usually protons are not movable unless extreme force is used

  66. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you know until the point?

  67. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Unless extreme electric force?

  68. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    protons can't generally be removed so just saying the problem is dominated by the amount of electrons in a given system

  69. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If they cannot be moved, then how come electric field is not dominated by protons?

  70. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    flow of electrons or charged objects(increase in electrons is another way of saying it since protons are immobile) creates a type of electromagnetic force

  71. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    charged objects implies that electrons are packed more than the object original possessed you get that

  72. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Is current speed the rate of electrons speed?

  73. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That also concerns with electrical potential difference you remember?

  74. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Nope. Lets go back to this question. Problem first! Concepts last!

  75. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Do you prefer using Skype as medium of communication?

  76. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Typing goes so slow

  77. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    But really. I'll give you a hint There only 2 concepts to this problems and they are very basic. Repulsive and attractive force and Coulomb Law.

  78. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh yea that's pretty elementary

  79. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Elementary concepts are sometimes the most tricky and confusing. Now try it.

  80. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1 Attachment
  81. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    just for our reference

  82. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I did say this is one of the easier electric field problem. This is 1st chapter out of 12 chapter in the E&M course.

  83. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ok this is a cheese

  84. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Now solve for the resultant.

  85. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    wait a moment I am looking up the k value because my memory is crap

  86. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Getting the resultant is a bit complicated.

  87. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what's the k again?

  88. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    9.0 x 109 N • m2 / C2 Can I assume this since it's' in air

  89. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes.

  90. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How would you calculate the resultant force then. You can just explain the steps.

  91. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Alright no problem

  92. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I would first plug in the values in the equation for the electric field between q1 and q3 and then calculate another between q2 and q3 after which I will use the trigonometry to find the vector of each in regards to q2

  93. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You mean find the electric force between q1 and q3? Then find electric force between q2 and q3

  94. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Not quite right on the trig part.

  95. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yeah exactly based on the q3 I would find the electric field acting from two different directions and use the cosine law to account for the angle because they are not in straight line.

  96. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    With everything else aside this seems pretty simple when actually doing and less pondering.

  97. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Enthrall me now

  98. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You said I will use trig to find vector of each in regards to q2. q2 is negative and q3 is positive. The q3 is moving away from the q2 toward the right side in a straight line. Therefore you use trig from the electric force between q1 and q3

  99. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    q1 and q3 repel diagonal. Use trig to figure the angle value and use it solve for x and y components of the q1-q3 electric force.

  100. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Show me the equation then?

  101. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh you are saying that we make a triangle and then bisect the base of the line connecting q1 and q3 so that properties will the identical to each other between q1 and q3 altogether attracting the -2qC now I get it that 's much better

  102. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the find the length of the line bisecting the triangle and that's basically the force acting towards q2 which then I do the calculation for the two and get the final answer!!!!

  103. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Not sure what you mean.

  104. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    See thesis why I love physics the more you think about it the better your understanding becomes

  105. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok I'll draw it for you

  106. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1439609545525:dw|

  107. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    acting on the q2

  108. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    because both q1 and q3 have all equal properties this way now that the line is bisecting the triangle.

  109. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Use the cosine law to find the bisecting line and that's the net electric force towards q2

  110. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and you would do another round with q2 and net q1 q3 to get the final answer.

  111. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1439609508807:dw|

  112. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    C(cos45) to find x component C(sin45) to find y component

  113. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    There is one more step to this? Which is it?

  114. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It is a right triangle with congruent legs, so it is at 45 degrees.

  115. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    exactly like I drew

  116. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    q2 to q3 is a straight line.

  117. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    One way or the other you would need to extend the lines to account for the force acting against it using your trigs

  118. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    My way is one way I think

  119. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    bisect the triangle like you said because of the congruent legs, and given the same properties of q1 and q3 you can use the cosine alone to find the bisecting line equidiving the angle at q2

  120. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1439610086603:dw|

  121. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    q2 and q3 attract in a straight line. q1 and q3 repel diagonally.

  122. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You can do this only with the electric charges with same properties

  123. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Your graph is messy. Use the straight line and text feature.

  124. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    against one attracting

  125. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Do it and tell me the answer then.

  126. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ok

  127. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1439610270416:dw|

  128. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Do you get my reasoning?

  129. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So this way you would need to know cosine(45)=adjacent/hypotenuse and I believe that hypotenuse is known so that way I can get the length of adjacent. Now you can either convert that to the ratio between hypotenuse(electrical field originally calculated) and adjacent(bisector) to get the Fnet of the q1 and q2 acting on q3. Then Fe=(k*Fnet(q1,q3)(q2))/square of the length of bisector=electric charge acting on q2!

  130. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How would you know the charge of q4. And it takes a while to figure out the length of q4 using pythagorean theorem

  131. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Why not just identify all the forces, then subtract if it goes left and add if it goes up and to the right.

  132. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    q4 is valid because both electric fields have identical properties acting on the opposite charge at same angle achieved y the bisector

  133. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You can assume one of the congruent sides to be the electric field of either q3 or q2 and treat it as a side and get the bisector from that value. And that bisector which is smaller than either of them ( as far as I can see from the diagram ) the only thing will be the straigt electric field acting on the q2.

  134. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I think there is pythegorena ways to do it, but assuming one of the congruent sides as being equal to the calculated electric field of either q3 or q1 is good enough to get the corresponding bisector

  135. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    This will eliminate having to use the ratio

  136. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Tell me the charge I would have to solve for find the resultant force?

  137. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1439611447511:dw|

  138. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and where would you find the electric force to use cos(45) at?

  139. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ouch flip that upside down sorry |dw:1439611674098:dw|

  140. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Show me your forces and label them.

  141. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you follow my reasoning?

  142. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Write me the formula by labeling things and assuming. Example: Let C be electric force between q1 and q2 Let B be electric force between q1 and q3

  143. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1439612004309:dw|

  144. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1439612083672:dw|

  145. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It's actually well founded

  146. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Relies on easier concepts

  147. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What point are you trying to find? I am confused.

  148. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    q2 and q4?

  149. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no once q4(artificially made) is established no worries about anything else

  150. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    for it will be q4 and q2 with opposite charges

  151. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh I forgot to write this. Find the resultant force on q3 -_-

  152. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    q3?

  153. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I thought you said q2 but sure I'll work my way around it

  154. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You only want the resultant force on q3. so q3 will rely on q1 and q2 Forget the force betweem q1 and q2

  155. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    But are you convinced with my line of reasoning to find q2?

  156. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How are you finding q2? With cos45?

  157. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I just said, the two charges with identical properties are acting on q2, hence attracting it. In this case exclusively the method I just told you about works in the resultant force acting on q2 if you read my drawing

  158. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the y component should be going up. Not down.

  159. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    y component you mean q2?

  160. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    *two opposite charges attract

  161. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes, it looks going down.

  162. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The answer has it that it goes up.

  163. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    There is nothing pulling it downwards.

  164. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    q2?

  165. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Opposite charges attract, same charges repel. They are different charges attracting

  166. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Are they no

  167. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If you back to the original problem. What is the resultant force on q3? |dw:1439612814025:dw| All positive on the y axis.

  168. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You can try to debunk my explanation using your "own" theory and not just from your text book. Where is your support using princ

  169. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ciples

  170. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Alright my comp's dying so let me recharge it up.

  171. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Um, there is no other way to do bro. You cannot assume things work geometrically by adding a test charge. You cannot bisect something if the q1 and q2 are not even equal to each other.

  172. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Just calculate your answer.

  173. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It does not work at different charges.

  174. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ==q1=q2 from your statement i said repeatedly "if two be the same

  175. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    be back in a s

  176. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    q1=q3 q2 is different.

  177. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.