A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

help, medal and fan The following is the graph of f(x) = 3(x - 3)2 + 1.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

  2. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    what do you think?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    do i solve the problem?

  4. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    All you have to do is find out if it's true or false

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    There are a couple different ways you could approach this. The equation is already provided, you just need to know if it's the correct equation for the graph. You could pick points on the graph and plug them into the equation to see if they fit, or just think back to the vertex form equation...

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i know, but how do i know? like should i solve the problem for x to see if its right? online schooling gets confusing

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    woo, getting more confussed, to many people replying, my computer being slow to catch up lol

  8. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    no it's true plug in (3,1) \(f(x) = 3(x - 3)^2 + 1\\1=3(3-3)^2+1\\3-3=0\\0^2=0\\3*0=0\\1=1\) another point (2,4) \(4= 3(2 - 3)2 + 1\\4=3*-1^2+1\\-1^2=1\\3*1=3\\3+1=4\\4=4\)

  9. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    @sohailiftikhar is wrong

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i see what you mean @Mehek14 .

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @Penguin7 , I agree with @Mehek14 !

  12. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    how am I wrong when the solutions are correct?

  13. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    if you want more proof, why don't you graph it using desmos?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    desmos confuses me..just saying lol

  15. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    because that is one of the points in the parabola

  16. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    so it has to be a solution in the equation if the equation is true

  17. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the output of x=1 is not shown in the graph that @Penguin7 attached

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Using the vertex form equation, -h is how far the graph moves to the right and +k is how far up it moves. Your graph moved 3 to the right and 1 up so that gets you to y=a(x-3)^2+1

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    to find a, you can plug in values...(2,4) and (4,4) are clearly visible on the graph.

  20. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    this matches the graph that was attached

    1 Attachment
  21. Mehek14
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    you have (3,1), (2,4), and (4,4) in both graphs

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so, can we all agree that @Mehek14 is right?

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @Penguin7 , yes!!! @Mehek14 is correct. If it helps you decide at all, I am a math teacher. :)

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay. well, i hope both you and @Mehek14 are okay will me taging u both..bc i know ill need help.

  25. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.