anonymous
  • anonymous
tanley wants to know how many students in his school enjoy watching talk shows on TV. He asks this question to all 24 students in his history class and finds that 55% of his classmates enjoy watching talk shows on TV. He claims that 55% of the school's student population would be expected to enjoy watching talk shows on TV. Is Stanley making a valid inference about his population?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
HELP
anonymous
  • anonymous
HELLO
anonymous
  • anonymous
He is making a valid inference because he is Sampling, which is instead of taking the entire school and counting each individual person, he is taking a small sample and amplifying it to fit the entire school. It's a common technique most Scientists use to get the population density of an entire area without counting the absolute entire area

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anonymous
  • anonymous
It may not be exact, but it would be close
anonymous
  • anonymous
i can show you the answer choices
anonymous
  • anonymous
No, it is not a valid inference because he asked all 24 students in his history class instead of taking a sample from his math class No, it is not a valid inference because his classmates do not make up a random sample of the students in the school Yes, it is a valid inference because his classmates make up a random sample of the students in the school Yes, it is a valid inference because he asked all 24 students in his history class
anonymous
  • anonymous
hello
anonymous
  • anonymous
helloooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry I was away for a moment, it is C, the third one
anonymous
  • anonymous
are u sure
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm 89% sure, His classmates do make a random sample of students and it really would not differ if they were in his math class, I'm guessing at that grade level they would all be in the same classes, no matter what the time they are all in those classes and did not choose to enroll specifically in History, so yes, it is a random sample of students
anonymous
  • anonymous
i wil give u medals for all q i ask no matter wat
anonymous
  • anonymous
A researcher posts an online advertisement offering $25 in exchange for participation in a short study. The researcher accepts the first 10 people who respond to the advertisement. Which of the following statements is true about the sample? It is not a valid sample because it is only a short study. It is a valid sample because money was offered to participants. It is a valid sample because the first 10 people were selected to participate. It is not a valid sample because it is not a random sample of the population.

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