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jewlzme17

  • one year ago

Which Symmetry? Options: Y axis symmetry,X axis symmetry, and Origin symmetry. 1. x-y^2=0 2. y= x^4-x^2+3 3.y=x/x^2+1 4. y=(sqrt 9-x^2) 5.xy^2+10=0 6. xy=4

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  1. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    Please Explain how you did it!

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    See if this helps. ODD Functions: Opposite X's and Opposite Y's and symmetrical to the origin. EVEN Functions: Opposite X's nut Equal Y's. In that case even functioms would be symmetrical to the y axis. If you have opposite x's and opposite y's then that means you are symmetrical to the origin. Ex: (5,10) (-5,-10). With X- Axis, your Y values change. Ex: (-3,5) (-3,-5)

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Try and solve the first one, and ill let you know if you got it.

  4. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    okay so x-y^2=0 will go to (-x)-y^2=0 so it would be y axis symm

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Let me ask this first. Do you agree at x^2, it creates a parabla

  6. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    yes

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The equation ultimately ends up being. X=Y^2. You probabably recognize the opposite of that, Y=X^2. With Y=x^2 the parabla would make a U shape that would mean the ordered pairs would have opposite x's but equal y's or in other words, symmetrical to the y axis.. Now if X is what your trying to find, what must it be symmetrical to?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Does any of that make sense to you? Do i need to clarify anything?

  9. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    yea it kind of does! ha but for the x axis you change the y. So from (x,y) to (x,-y)

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes exactly. Think of the parabola on it's side. Like how Y=x^2 the parabola went through (0,0) and the two pieces curved up on each side of the y axis. In this case, your just flipped on the x-axis, and instead of your x values changing, your y values change, exactly like you mentioned

  11. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    okay so it would be x-y^2=0 to x+y^2=0

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No. The question you asked, was what would be the symmetry. The symmetry would be over the x-axis. x-y^2=0 to x+y^2=0 can lead to 2 separate functions: x-y^2=0 ends up being x=y^2. x+y^2=0 ends up being x=-y^2. Making the parabola negative negates it, and flips facing the other direction.

  13. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    would 5 be xy^2+10=0 to x(-y)^2+10=0 to xy^2+10=0 so it is the x -axis? But no I know that it's just I'm showing my work on how.

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Is your question if that your work is right?

  15. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    yea! and if the axis is correct

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Your axis is correct. It is symmetrical over the x-axis. However im confused with what you typed "xy^2+10=0 to x(-y)^2+10=0 to xy^2+10=0".

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What I would do personally, is make a table with your x values. and just plug them in and see if they follow any particular rule.

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Heres an example.

  19. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    that was me changing symbols and then solving ha idk that is what my teacher taught me.

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1439880356001:dw|

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That is very sloppy but it proves my point. These numbers aren't real, its just to prove a point. If you were to plug in x=1, you would get y=2. But if you were to also plug in x=1 to the equation, you would get y=-2

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do you know what applies to each symmetrical value?

  23. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    okay yea I see what you are saying! What about the other questions? like idk what to do with the whole sqrt or the fraction.

  24. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    But do you mean what it converts to?

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i have the rules out in front of me, i can type it out if you think you may need it.

  27. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    for the x axis it changes from (x,y) to (x,-y) for the y axis it changes from (x,y) to (-x,y) and for origin it changes from (x,y) to (-x,-y)

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok, lets try number 4

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Just clarifying this is the equation: \[y=\sqrt{9}-x^2\]

  30. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    the sqrt is over the whole equation

  31. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    \[y=\sqrt{9-x^2}\]

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok, well what do you think you should do.

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what step would you take first.

  34. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    um changing -x^2 into a positive x^2? I don't know

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Not quite, y is already by itself so all you really need to do is just plug and chug. For example, say you plug in 3 or even -3 for x. you would get \[y=\sqrt{9-9}\]

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2 ordered pairs right out the bat would be, 3,0 and -3,0

  37. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    okay so it would be y axis

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah exactly, plugging in some other numbers would get you decimals. I was just too lazy.

  39. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    hahaa okay! I understand it so much better now! Thank you!

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No problem, glad I could help! If you need any future help, just let me know.

  41. jewlzme17
    • one year ago
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    I will! Thank you so much again!

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