A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

how do you find the axis of symmetry? heres and example equation: F(x)=3(x+4)^2+1

  • This Question is Closed
  1. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The axis of symmetry is the vertical line that goes through the vertex of a quadratic equation.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @jchick can you help with this too? since its in vertex form would it be (4,1)?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I understand how to get it from a graph just not in vertex or standard equation form

  4. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    y=3(x+4)2+1

  5. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    That is the vertex form

  6. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    (−4,1) is the vertex

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh okay, I hforget that the h spot hould be a -

  8. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The standard form of a parabola's equation is generally expressed: y=ax2+bx+c

  9. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The vertex form of a parabola's equation is generally expressed as: y = a(x-h)^2+k

  10. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    If a is positive then the parabola opens upwards like a regular "U". If a is negative, then the graph opens downwards like an upside down "U".

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    uh huh, and the axis is normally x=-b/2 a right ? for standard?>

  12. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Do you mean The axis of symmetry?

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes

  14. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok

  15. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Axis of Symmetry from Standard Form ax^2 + bx + c

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I get the vertex form now and what changes the direction a parabola open just not how to get the axis of symmetry in standard form.

  17. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    a(x - h)^2 + k is vertex form

  18. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The first one is the standard form

  19. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Axis of Symmetry in Standard Form ax^2 + bx + c

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah. so what gets the axis from standard?

  21. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The standard form of a parabola's equation is generally expressed: y=ax2+bx+c The role of 'a' If a>0, the parabola opens upwards if a<0 it opens downwards.

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    wait I thought that the standard form equation was ax^2+bx+C not the axis of symmetry .....

  23. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1439938305007:dw|

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ???

  25. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    that is the axis of symmetry

  26. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    -5/2a? what that from??

  28. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    That is -b on top

  29. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    sorry bad drawing

  30. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

  31. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Do you understand now?

  32. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1439938524109:dw|

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that's okay. so if I had 2x^2-16x+15 the axis of symmetry would be 16/2(2) so itd be 4?

  34. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh okay now I get it

  36. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok good I didn't mean to be confusing.

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    its okay

  38. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Don't forget to fan me and also to give a medal for answers

  39. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    If you fan me it is easier for me to find your future questions

  40. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Do you have anymore questions

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I did fan you on the last ? and idk yet I might.. ill tag you in the though..

  42. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok I didn't see it sorry lol

  43. jchick
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok

  44. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.