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anonymous

  • one year ago

PLEASE HELP!!! If a baseball player hits a baseball from 4 feet off the ground with an initial velocity of 64 feet per second, how long will it take the baseball to hit the ground?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hi

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hi

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you help me?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what grade r u in

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    10

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i thought it was easy 4th grade math sorry i'm a 6th grader.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    um, okay

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sorry bye

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Vocaloid

  11. DDCamp
    • one year ago
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    You can use the equation: \[y = y_{initial} + v_{initial}\times t - 16 \times t^2 \] to find the height of the ball after t seconds. Solve the equation for y=0 and you'll get the time where the height is 0 (i.e. its on the ground)

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How come the direction of acceleration is not specified? You would need to identify the horizontal velocity and vertical velocity separately to know when exactly the ball will hit the ground.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so the answer is \[2 \pm \sqrt{17}/2 \] ?

  14. DDCamp
    • one year ago
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    @Robert136 The question doesn't ask where, just when.

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You don't know.

  16. DDCamp
    • one year ago
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    @RosieF The quadratic equation gives you two answers, because the graph of that function would look something like this:|dw:1439947696260:dw|

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    When the ball makes contact with ground is dependent on the direction of the hit. I get that the ball was hit at 4 feet with an initial veocity of 64f/s, however you would need to consider acceleration due to gravity with regards to the direction of velocity.

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How can you even assume that the ball follows pattern of hyperbola without being explicitly stated as so?

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    This question would be invalid in Newtonian mechanics.

  20. DDCamp
    • one year ago
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    Because I have a degree in physics...

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Then you must also know that the velocity is a vector value.

  22. DDCamp
    • one year ago
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    From the information we're given, the best assumption is that the problem meant a vertical velocity of 64 ft/s. The horizontal velocity is irrelevant.

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Usually angle is stated to the horizontal

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you just tell me if the answer that I got was right?

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    There is no right answer to this question as too much assumption is involved.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    well is my answer hypothetically right?

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    However for grade 10 math I would stick with that assumption that velocity was meant to the vertical. For in grade 10 math you cover parabola.

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