YumYum247
  • YumYum247
A soccerball was kicked at an angle of 28 deg to the ground and it landed 39.8m away. a) what was the velocity of the ball when kicked?
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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YumYum247
  • YumYum247
@Astrophysics just give me a quick hint and leave the rest to me.....
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
VECTORS PROJECTILE MOTION YAYAYAYA DIAGRAMS
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
|dw:1439958921010:dw|

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More answers

Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
|dw:1439959033896:dw| I wanted to make an arc
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
just tell me what's the first thing i need to look for....that's all
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
|dw:1439959053044:dw| now lets make it nice and clean so we know exactly what's going on, we need to find v0 here which is velocity of the ball when it was kicked.
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
You need to find your velocities at x and y direction, play around with it and apply kinematic formulas
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
yes but for that i need to find the final velocity :(
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
|dw:1439959268885:dw|
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
We don't actually need it, I have an idea!!!!
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Want to hear it
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
yuss!!!!
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
Vertical: Horizontal: a = -9.8m/sec2 dh = 39.8m Dh = 0m/s Vh = ? Vi = ? t = ? Vf = ? t = ?
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Ok I was actually thinking it gave us the maximum height
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
nope that's all we got???
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Good lets put everything in x and y direction...ok lets see and thing and have fun!
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
sorry i forgot to add the theta in there... Vertical: Horizontal: a = -9.8m/sec2 dh = 39.8m Dh = 0m/s Vh = ? Vi = ? t = ? Vf = ? t = ? Angle = 28deg
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
x - direction x = 39.8 m \[\large v_{x_0} = v_0 \cos (28)\] y-direction a = -g \[\large v_{y_0} = v_0 \sin(28)\] so this is what we're given hahahaaa
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
yes....
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Ok ok we can actually use the range formula
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
and find initial velocity instantly XD
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
\[R = \frac{ v_0^2\sin(2 \theta) }{ g }\]
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
hey about that..... what does it mean by Vi here, is it the horizontal velo or the vertical???
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Oh no that's the resultant velocity |dw:1439960011427:dw| what we're looking for
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
That can be split into components as shown to figure it out
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
yah cuz that formula says dh = Vi^2 X Sin2theta/a so that's why i was wondering what does that initial velocity means here....
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
horizontal or vertical...cuz if it's the resultant then shouldn't it be Vf^2????
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
I don't follow, that's the initial velocity, we are looking for the velocity that it was kicked at not at the velocity it landed at
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
|dw:1439960370291:dw|
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Oh I see what you're trying to do, no that's not right, because we're splitting the initial velocity into components
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
|dw:1439960455619:dw|
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Those are the components of the initial velocity, does that make sense?
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
you can label it as i for initial it's the same thing :P
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
those nots confuse me ......i only understand Vf, Vi and Vh
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Ok sorry ill fix it
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
Thanks :")
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
|dw:1439960585668:dw| same thing
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
oh now i see...... :D
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Yeah they are just components of the initial velocity :-)
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
\[R = \frac{ v_i^2\sin(2 \theta) }{ g }\]
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
ok so where are we going with that formula, are we solving for the Vi there???
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Yup!
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
ok so it'll be like this....
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
|dw:1439960730234:dw|
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
do we take the square root??? O_o
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Mhm hold on a sec, lets just do the algebra first to avoid confusion the range here is our x or distance which is 39.8 m. It's always best to do algebra first then plug things in especially when you get into deeper physics, it will benefit you. \[x= \frac{ v_i^2 \sin(2 \theta) }{ g }\] now solve for the initial velocity
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Don't plug anything in just solve for initial velocity
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
variable
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
ok so rearrange the variables first....
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Yup
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
and then plug i nthe numbers....???
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Yeah
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
aight thanks man, i really appreciate your help..... Stay cute and blessed!!!! :")
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Np, lets just finish it off :P, so what do you get when you solve for initial velocity when you rearrange don't worry about making mistakes, that's how we learn!
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
hold up.....
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Take your time
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
x = Vi^2 X Sin2theta/a x.a = Vi^2 X Sin2theta x.2/sin2Theta = Vi^2
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Perfect now just square root it and we're good!
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
|dw:1439961336297:dw|
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
I'm assuming that 2 in the numerator was meant to be an a haha
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
ok man thanks alot i really appreciate your effort.... stay blessed!! :)
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
|dw:1439961409567:dw| whats that
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
x
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
or R
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
39.8m
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Hmm...our equation was \[x= \frac{ v_i^2 \sin(2 \theta) }{ g } \implies v_i = \sqrt{\frac{ gx }{ \sin(2 \theta) }}\]
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
I think you may have added an extra x by mistake
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
yah!!! thats it....!!!
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
no that's just my hand writing :"D
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
ok thanks and good night, sleep tight and don't let the bugs bite :"D
Astrophysics
  • Astrophysics
Take care :)
YumYum247
  • YumYum247
too 2 :)

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