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anonymous

  • one year ago

Can someone please help me with this? I need equation help.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    If a 10. m^3 volume of air (acting as an ideal gas) is at a pressure of 760 mm and a temperature of 27 degrees Celsius is taken to a high altitude where the pressure is 400. mm Hg and a temperature of -23 degrees Celsius, what volume will it occupy? (Hint: remember the temperature must be in Kelvin).

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    This is the question. The formulas I was given are:

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[P_{1}V _{1} = P_{2} V_{2}\]

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[V_{1}/T_{1} = V_{2}/T_{2}\]

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[P_{1} V_{1}/T_{1} = P_{2} V_{2}/ T_{2}\]

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I have no idea which formula to use, or if I need to make conversions from the 400 mm Hg

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Robert136 could you maybe look? I would appreciate it so much

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Robert136 could you maybe look? I would appreciate it so much

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Elsa213

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The question is poorly worded. Try again.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I know.. I'll give you a medal anyway since you were kind enough to reply

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I get it now.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1.Assume that there is 10m^3 volume of air 2.The air above has a pressure of 760mm & temperature of 300 Kelvin degrees 3.The air mentioned above is taken to where pressure is 400mm and 250 Kelvin 4. Calculate the volume that results from change in temperature and pressure.

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ah I see now. So I need to plug those values into the last equation I posted and solve?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Definitely!

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thank you so so much! That cleared up a ton of confusion! I appreciate it! :D

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No problem. I am assuming this is a last year high school chemistry or first year university?

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I had to do it a while ago

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    It's actually for Physics. They taught me how to use the formulas but threw this curveball at me, and I had no idea what formula would work or if I needed to do conversions for it beforehand.

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh I see your problem now. Make sure to use the Kelvin. Usually units of the pressure doesn't matter because they are all proportional .

  21. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    for an ideal gas, you will have been given something like \(\huge pV= nRT\) as R = const, we can say: \(\huge \frac{pV}{nT} = const\) as it is the same amount of gas, we can say \(\huge \frac{pV}{T} = const\) but as @Robert136 so expertly points out, you need to be sure that you use Kelvin and you are solving \(\huge \frac{p_1V_1}{T_1} = \frac{p_2V_2}{T_2}\) thus \(\huge V_2 = \frac{T_2}{T_1} . \frac{ p_1 }{ p_2}\ . V_1\) again, using Kelvin https://gyazo.com/dad5d1f102f61add6b05a906ef9a617f

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @IrishBoy123 thank you for your response! :D

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