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anonymous

  • one year ago

How do I calculate the absolute uncertainty when there is an exponent? (see question 2)

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1) when the number is (5.3322∗ 10^-5) would the uncertainty be (1*10^-9) or (0.0001)?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2) how to calculate the absolute uncertainty when there is an exponent? For example \[(-7.5899*10^{-6}) *(22.62 \pm 0.01) \].

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    for example lets say u are given 10.1 you dont know if it was 10.05 to 10.15 so your uncertainty is 10.1 +/- 0.05

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    We were told in class that when the uncertainty is implicit we will assume its the last digit and it will always be 1. For example: 0.0967 the uncertainty will be 0.0001.

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    (5.3322∗ 10^-5) same thing this part 5.3322 you dont know if it was 5.33215 to 5.33225 so 5.3322 +/- 0.00005

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok i guess that maybe fine too its like roudning up the uncertainty itself

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    +/- 0.00005 = +/- 0.0001

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ooohhhh ok. so the uncertainty will be determined regardless of the exponent.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah that is right

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    (5.33220∗ 10^-5) if they want to go upto exponent

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you have to add that 0

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok. thanks!!

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sure np

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    for your question 2, absolute uncertainty is that the uncertainty that is based on proportion

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    iwhen y=x^n, is the formula n* (relative uncertainty), relative uncertainty= (uncertainty/value)

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay i see

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    here is a more logical approach to calculating your absolute uncertainty

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    suppose you have 10.0+/- 0.1 and 2.0+/- 0.2 you see 10.0*2.0 = 20.0 then you see the max and mix that happens with the uncertainty 10.1*2.2 = 20.2 + 2.02 = 22.22 and the min 9.9*1.8 = 18-0.18=17.82

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    (22.22-17.82)/2 would be the uncertainty?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    let me check how u actually find absolute uncertainties hmm

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    look at this http://web.uvic.ca/~jalexndr/192UncertRules.pdf

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    that is probably best forget what i said so far

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok. thank you so much!!

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