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anonymous

  • one year ago

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  1. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    what is \(f(1)\)?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    g(f(1))

  3. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    but what is f(1)?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    -4x + 7?

  5. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    do you understand what \(f(1)\) means?

  6. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    it means put a \(1\) in the function \(f\) where ever you see an \(x\).

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no this is in a packet about composition of functions. Just problems to work out. I'm trying to look online.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    not much explaination

  9. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    but before you can understand composition of functions, you must understand a function.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay

  11. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    for the function \(f(x) = -4x+7\) we have \(f(1) = -4*1+7=3\). Does this make sense?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah

  13. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    ok now then, what is \(g(3)\)?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    g(3) is we put a 3 in the function where the x is @zzr0ck3r

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and it would look like g(3) = 2*3 - 6 I think?

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    which is 0

  17. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Hey, so the notation just implies g(f(1)) it's probably simpler to find g(f(x)) first this just means plug the function f(x) wherever there is an x in function g(x). Try that out :)

  18. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Or we can do it the way @zzr0ck3r what ever you are comfortable with!

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i'm not sure how I would right that

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    write*

  21. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    No worries, f(x) = -4x+7 and g(x) = 2x-6 so we take function f(x) and plug it in g(x) \[g(f(x)) = 2(-4x+7)-6\]

  22. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Now you can find g(f(1)) by plugging in 1 where the x is and evaluating

  23. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Does this make sense? It can be a bit confusing haha.

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so it would be 0 then?

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    It makes sense though a bit complicated. It's something I'm gonna have to really ingrain in my head.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Astrophysics how would I solve it the way @zzr0ck3r did it? I wasn't sure what to do after he left.

  27. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yup, 0 sounds good!

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thanks for helping me. You're awesome :)

  29. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Ok so with zz's method you found what f(1) was which is 3 correct

  30. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Then we just take f(1) and plug that in g(x) for g(f(1)) = 2(3)-6 = 0 :)

  31. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Either way works :P

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh I see. Both of you guys gave me good ways. Thank you again

  33. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yw :)

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