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anonymous

  • one year ago

How many moles of ethylene (C2H4) can react with 12.9 liters of oxygen gas at 1.2 atmospheres and 297 Kelvin? C2H4(g) + 3O2(g) yields 2CO2(g) + 2H2O(g) I have a test later today, please show me how to do this so I'll know what to do on the test. Thank you. :)

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  1. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    I'm pretty sure this is a PVNRT problem. Do you know the ideal gas law formula?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  3. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    Okay, well the first thing you need to go is find out how many moles of Oxygen you have, using the ideal gas law formula

  4. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    Can you show me how to do that?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think so, one sec let me look

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I attempted it by plugging it into the formula before but I just don't think I got the right answer

  7. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    You should know the formula if you have a test later :s but it's really easy to remember! It's PVNRT. Or PV = nRT where p = pressure (atm) v = volume (L) R = gas constant n = moles (mol) t = temperature (T)

  8. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    So, use the values given in the problem to solve for n, which equals the number of moles of Oxygen gas. What value did you get?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I got 0.634 moles

  10. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    Okay awesome. So there's 0.634 moles of Oxygen. Since you have a chemical equation and the moles of Oxygen, do you think you sort of know how to get to the moles of C2H4?

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That's where I get lost lol

  12. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    That's okay. That's where most people get lost. So, at this point we have to use dimensional analysis. Just a fancy word of saying to get from one thing to another. My high school chem teacher used to call it train-and-caboose

  13. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440095137685:dw|

  14. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    You have to use the chemical equation to determine the ratio. So, for every 3 mol of Oxygen there's 1 mol of C2H4

  15. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440095235516:dw| make sure to cross out your units

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok thank you, I'll try it :)

  17. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    Okay! Practice makes perfect! Let me know if you have anymore questions

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thanks!

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok, sorry I'm really tired haha. How am I supposed to plug it in?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @sjg13e

  21. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    What do you mean? Can you clarify? Plug in what? Do you mean the ideal gas law formula or dimensional analysis?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    dimensional analysis

  23. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    Oh okay, well that's a little different. The only way to really understand it is by doing practice problems, but I generally use this sort of thinking: |dw:1440096529907:dw|

  24. sjg13e
    • one year ago
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    heres a link that might help http://www.katmarsoftware.com/articles/railroad-track-unit-conversion.htm

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ohh I see, thank you so much

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