anonymous
  • anonymous
How many moles of ethylene (C2H4) can react with 12.9 liters of oxygen gas at 1.2 atmospheres and 297 Kelvin? C2H4(g) + 3O2(g) yields 2CO2(g) + 2H2O(g) I have a test later today, please show me how to do this so I'll know what to do on the test. Thank you. :)
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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sjg13e
  • sjg13e
I'm pretty sure this is a PVNRT problem. Do you know the ideal gas law formula?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
Okay, well the first thing you need to go is find out how many moles of Oxygen you have, using the ideal gas law formula

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sjg13e
  • sjg13e
Can you show me how to do that?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think so, one sec let me look
anonymous
  • anonymous
I attempted it by plugging it into the formula before but I just don't think I got the right answer
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
You should know the formula if you have a test later :s but it's really easy to remember! It's PVNRT. Or PV = nRT where p = pressure (atm) v = volume (L) R = gas constant n = moles (mol) t = temperature (T)
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
So, use the values given in the problem to solve for n, which equals the number of moles of Oxygen gas. What value did you get?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I got 0.634 moles
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
Okay awesome. So there's 0.634 moles of Oxygen. Since you have a chemical equation and the moles of Oxygen, do you think you sort of know how to get to the moles of C2H4?
anonymous
  • anonymous
That's where I get lost lol
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
That's okay. That's where most people get lost. So, at this point we have to use dimensional analysis. Just a fancy word of saying to get from one thing to another. My high school chem teacher used to call it train-and-caboose
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
|dw:1440095137685:dw|
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
You have to use the chemical equation to determine the ratio. So, for every 3 mol of Oxygen there's 1 mol of C2H4
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
|dw:1440095235516:dw| make sure to cross out your units
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok thank you, I'll try it :)
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
Okay! Practice makes perfect! Let me know if you have anymore questions
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok, sorry I'm really tired haha. How am I supposed to plug it in?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@sjg13e
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
What do you mean? Can you clarify? Plug in what? Do you mean the ideal gas law formula or dimensional analysis?
anonymous
  • anonymous
dimensional analysis
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
Oh okay, well that's a little different. The only way to really understand it is by doing practice problems, but I generally use this sort of thinking: |dw:1440096529907:dw|
sjg13e
  • sjg13e
heres a link that might help http://www.katmarsoftware.com/articles/railroad-track-unit-conversion.htm
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ohh I see, thank you so much

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