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anonymous

  • one year ago

If 45g of LiF dissolved in 1.8kg of water, what would be the expected change in boiling point? The boiling point constant for water (Kb) is 0.51 degrees C/m. - 0.49 degrees C - 0.98 degrees C - 1.9 degrees C - 3.5 degrees C Im not sure which one it is I got both 0.49 and 0.98 Please Help. I will medal.

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  1. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    What calculations did you perform?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I ended up going with the first answer 0.49 based on my calculations

  3. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    did you have \(\large \Delta T=i*K_b*m=2*(0.51~^oC/m)*\dfrac{(\frac{45~g}{25.9~g/mol})}{1.8~kg}\)

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No and when I solve yours I get 25 which isn't a choice

  5. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    you're solving it incorrectly, because i get 0.984555984555984583356

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm so lost

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't know who's right

  8. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    I'm right lol you got 0.49 because you didn't take into account that i=2

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay thank you so much

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    CaN I ask another

  11. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    no problem, and sure, shoot.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A 65 gram of some unknown metal at 100.0 deg C is added to 100.8grams at 22 degrees Celsius. The temperature of the water rises 27.0 degrees C. Of the specific heat capacity of liquid water is 4.18 J/degC*g, what is the specific heat of the metal?

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The choices are -2.25 J/(C*g) -1.75 J/(C*g) -0.444 J/(C*g) -0.324 J/(C*g)

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't know Where to start @arronq and how to get the answer

  15. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    So this is a little complicated but bare with me. First you use the mass of the water, the specific heat capacity and the change of temperature the water had to find the heat lost by the metal. Now that you have the heat lost by the metal, you can use the mass of the metal and the temperature change of the metal (along with the heat you found in the first part) to solve for the specific heat capacity. The equation is \(\sf q=m*C_p*\Delta T\) q= heat m=mass Cp=specific heat capacity \(\Delta T\)=change in Temp

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Based on what your saying and what I do know I'm getting 0.444 with my calculations. Is that correct?

  17. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    show your calculations

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I can't I don't have a camera and my computers to old to type them in

  19. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    so how am i supposed to see if you're doing it right?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think I am I just need to double check the final response with you and if I get it wrong I'll try it a different way until I'm doing it right

  21. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    its right

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay thank you so much

  23. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    no problem

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