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anonymous

  • one year ago

help!

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Vocaloid

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    this is an assignment now, not an exam :)

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    In this experiment, you will be using two coins as a simulation for a real-world compound event. Suppose that a family has an equally likely chance of having a cat or a dog. If they have two pets, they could have 1 dog and 1 cat, they could have 2 dogs, or they could have 2 cats. 1. What is the theoretical probability that the family has two dogs or two cats? 2. Describe how to use two coins to simulate which two pets the family has. 3. Flip both coins 50 times and record your data in a table like the one below. Result Frequency Heads, Heads Heads, Tails Tails, Heads Tails, Tails Total 50 4. Based on your data, what is the experimental probability that the family has two dogs or two cats? 5. If the family has three pets, what is the theoretical probability that they have three dogs or three cats? 6. How could you change the simulation to generate data for three pets?

  5. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    ok, first find 2 coins in your house somewhere

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok now what? @Vocaloid

  7. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    ok, keep them with you, we're going to need them pretty soon let's start with #1: the theoretical probability that the family will have two dogs or two cats first, the problem tells us that the probability of getting a dog and a cat are equally likely, so probability of a dog = 1/2 probability of a cat = 1/2 so, probability of two dogs = (probability of a dog)*(probability of a dog) = ?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.25

  9. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    right probability of two cats = (probability of a cat)*(probability of a cat) = ?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.25

  11. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    right, now we add the together to get our answer for #1: 0.25 + 0.25 = ?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.5

  13. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    right, let's move on to #2

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ?? @Vocaloid

  16. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    we're going to use a coin to represent each pet. the probability of getting heads on a coin is 1/2 and tails is also 1/2, just like dog = 1/2 and cat = 1/2 so, we'll flip the coins one by one. a heads represents a dog and a tails represents a cat. so, as an example, if we flip heads on the first coin and tails on the second, that represents the family getting a dog and then a cat

  17. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    that should be a sufficient answer for 2, just don't copy my words directly, ok?

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok i wont copy.. i put it in my words, dont worry.

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok next ! #3

  20. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    do you understand what I wrote, though? this is important

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes i understand

  22. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    #3 is asking you to do the simulation I just described take both coins, and flip them one at a time. now, take a look at each row of the table: Heads, Heads means the first coin is heads and the second coins is heads Heads, Tails means the first coin is heads and the second coin is tails Tails, Heads, means the first coin is tails and the second coin is heads Tails, Tails, means the first coin is tails and the second coin is tails

  23. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    so, take your two coins. flip the first one, flip the second one, and tell me what you get for each one

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i got heads and heads

  25. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    right, so we put a tally mark in the first row, "Heads, Heads". now do the same thing 49 more times and fill out the table

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what!

  27. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    read the problem...

  28. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    it wants you to flip both coins 50 times

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok and then

  30. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    so, we just flipped both coins once, and now we do the same thing 49 more times

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    but what do i put for frequency

  32. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    frequency is the number of times you get for each of the 4 outcomes

  33. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    so keep flipping the coins and keep track of how many times each outcome happens

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh i get it okay... give me 3 minutes to do it :)

  35. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    make sure to stop at 50

  36. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    have fun

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok thanks

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    done!

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i got ... 15 12 21 8

  40. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    that adds up to 56 not 50

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh whoops.. hold on let me fix it

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    15 12 9 14

  43. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    much better, now let's move on to #4

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok

  45. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    take a look at your table, and add together: Heads,Heads + Tails,Tails

  46. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    29

  47. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    now divide that by 50 and there's our answer

  48. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.58

  49. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    right

  50. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    let's move to #5: probability of 3 cats or 3 dogs going back to what we said earlier... probability of cat = 1/2 probability of dog = 1/2 so probability of three dogs = (probability of dog)*(probability of dog)*(probability of dog) = ?

  51. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.125

  52. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    right probability of 3 cats = (probability of cat)*(probability of cat)*(probability of cat) = ?

  53. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.125

  54. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    now add them together 0.125 + 0.125 = ?

  55. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.25

  56. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    right, that's our answer for #5

  57. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok next!

  58. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    for 6, all we need to do is use 3 coins instead of 2 coins, since we want 3 pets

  59. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    and that should be it

  60. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok so what do i do

  61. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    that's it...

  62. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    whats number 6?

  63. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    read the problem again then read what I wrote...

  64. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i dont get it

  65. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Vocaloid please answer .. its the last one

  66. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    "How could you change the simulation to generate data for three pets?" our simulation used 2 coins and made data for 2 pets, so if we wanted 3 pets, we would use 3 coins instead of 2....

  67. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thats the answer?

  68. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    pretty much, yes......

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