anonymous
  • anonymous
what words would describe the behavior as a slave? Quiet, feeble, resolved Ashamed, unwilling, good Well-known, feeble, respected Faithful, determined, respected
Mathematics
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
multiple choice
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well this should be in English but it's okay. First what is a slave?
anonymous
  • anonymous
ops lol posted in wrong subject didnt notice

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Lol it happens
anonymous
  • anonymous
someone who is sold and forced to do work their owner asks them to
tkhunny
  • tkhunny
Could be any of the four. It is hoped there is a specific reference that one has in mind.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i know its not D slaves arent discribed as a respected person
anonymous
  • anonymous
A or B im thinking
anonymous
  • anonymous
A?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Correct, I was just typing a long paragraph but never mind.
tkhunny
  • tkhunny
Some are. I can easily argue all four unless you have a specific literary reference.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I know because we had that same question in l.a class
anonymous
  • anonymous
Excerpt from Chapter II. The New Master and Mistress Harriet Jacobs My grandmother's mistress had always promised her that, at her death, she should be free; and it was said that in her will she made good the promise. But when the estate was settled, Dr. Flint told the faithful old servant that, under existing circumstances, it was necessary she should be sold. On the appointed day, the customary advertisement was posted up, proclaiming that there would be a "public sale of negroes, horses, &c." Dr. Flint called to tell my grandmother that he was unwilling to wound her feelings by putting her up at auction, and that he would prefer to dispose of her at private sale. My grandmother saw through his hypocrisy (noun: pretending to be good); she understood very well that he was ashamed of the job. She was a very spirited woman, and if he was base (adjective: lacking higher values) enough to sell her, when her mistress intended she should be free, she was determined the public should know it. She had for a long time supplied many families with crackers and preserves; consequently, "Aunt Marthy," as she was called, was generally known, and every body who knew her respected her intelligence and good character. Her long and faithful service in the family was also well known, and the intention of her mistress to leave her free. When the day of sale came, she took her place among the chattels (noun: pieces of property; slaves), and at the first call she sprang upon the auction-block. Many voices called out, "Shame! Shame! Who is going to sell you, aunt Marthy? Don't stand there! That is no place for you." Without saying a word, she quietly awaited her fate. No one bid for her. At last, a feeble voice said, "Fifty dollars." It came from a maiden lady, seventy years old, the sister of my grandmother's deceased mistress. She had lived forty years under the same roof with my grandmother; she knew how faithfully she had served her owners, and how cruelly she had been defrauded (verb: cheated) of her rights; and she resolved to protect her. The auctioneer waited for a higher bid; but her wishes were respected; no one bid above her. She could neither read nor write; and when the bill of sale was made out, she signed it with a cross. But what consequence was that, when she had a big heart overflowing with human kindness? She gave the old servant her freedom.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i didnt think i needed to post that to get the question answered
tkhunny
  • tkhunny
Ambiguous questions always need more information.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok now is it answerable @tkhunny
tkhunny
  • tkhunny
" She was a very spirited woman" " She had for a long time supplied many families with crackers and preserves; consequently, "Aunt Marthy," as she was called, was generally known, and every body who knew her respected her intelligence and good character. Her long and faithful service in the family was also well known, " I'm not seeing "feeble" at all. No "shame". Looks like we're down to the last one.
anonymous
  • anonymous
B?
tkhunny
  • tkhunny
No. Read the story. What does it say? What part did I quote?

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