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steve816

  • one year ago

I really need help! Given the line 3x-5y=7, find the point-slope form of the equation of a line through (√3,1) that is A. parallel to the given line B. perpendicular to the given line

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  1. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    when the lines are parallel how are the slopes related? when the lines are perpendicular how are the slopes related?

  2. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    you have the equation of a line rearrange and determine the slope

  3. steve816
    • one year ago
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    I forgot everything about the parallel and perpendicular relations because I learned this in algebra but it wasn't taught in algebra 2 :(

  4. steve816
    • one year ago
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    A demonstration would be really appreciated.

  5. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    you have a second point (rt 3, 1)

  6. steve816
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  7. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    for any given line the slope is the same through any 2 points on that line |dw:1440210541130:dw|

  8. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440210622551:dw|

  9. steve816
    • one year ago
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    Okay thanks for clarifying on the point slope form.

  10. steve816
    • one year ago
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    now how would i find the perpendicular and parallel lines?

  11. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440210769085:dw|

  12. steve816
    • one year ago
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    I know the basics. I know that the slope stays the same but the y intercept is different.

  13. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440210854947:dw|

  14. steve816
    • one year ago
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    they are negative??

  15. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    yes. parallel lines have the same slope

  16. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    no exactly for perpendicular lines the product of the slopes is -1

  17. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    * not

  18. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    so back to the question you have the equation of the line in standard form you can rearrange and find the slope Part A parallel lines have the same slope and you have a point on that line find the equation of the parallel line to the one given Part B you can find the slope of the line perpendicular to the one given then using the given point and (x, y) you can find the equation of the line perpendicular to the original one given

  19. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    now please review the complete post and then answer the question completely

  20. steve816
    • one year ago
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    Alright.

  21. steve816
    • one year ago
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    There are infinitely many parallel and perpendicular lines right?

  22. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    focus on this question

  23. steve816
    • one year ago
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    And what do you mean by the product of the slope is -1 for perpendicular lines?

  24. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440211452873:dw|

  25. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    product is what you get when you multiply 2 terms

  26. steve816
    • one year ago
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    Ohhh okay this makes more sense about perpendicular lines now, thanks

  27. steve816
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440208587394:dw| Okay so I got the point slope form, but how would i change the equation to make it parallel?

  28. jennyrlz
    • one year ago
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    i am not up to date with the problem, but for a line to be paralel the slope must be the same

  29. jennyrlz
    • one year ago
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    aslo you would have to isolate the varioble, and simplify

  30. steve816
    • one year ago
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    Actually I got it :D YAAAY

  31. jennyrlz
    • one year ago
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    YAY :D. congrats :)

  32. jennyrlz
    • one year ago
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    -clap,clap,clap-

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