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mathmath333

  • one year ago

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  1. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440284134239:dw|

  2. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    \(\large \color{black}{\begin{align} & \normalsize \text{The Red and Green lines are perpendicular to each other}\hspace{.33em}\\~\\ & \normalsize \text{Find the number of shortest paths to go from A to B.}\hspace{.33em}\\~\\ & \normalsize \text{Find the total number of paths to go from A to B.}\hspace{.33em}\\~\\ & \normalsize \text{(Assume the points are equidistant)}\hspace{.33em}\\~\\ \end{align}}\)

  3. Miracrown
    • one year ago
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    You're welcom

  4. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    I'm on iPad , cannot draw out the paths, b to me , there are 2 shortest ways , and their weight is 6

  5. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    I will go look at my graph theory book and I am sure I will find something.

  6. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    are u sure its 6

  7. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Go, diagonal fromA, 3 times, then go straight to B 3 more

  8. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    there are algorithms for this, that would be a pain to teach on here. google Dijkstra's algorithm

  9. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    Assume each of the 6 red spaces have the same distance as the 3 green spaces, Number of paths = 9!/(6!3!)=84 ways

  10. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    diagonal?

  11. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    along the lines, if the question was for me.

  12. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    Djikistra algorithm finds shortest distance, where as i need the number of shortest paths

  13. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Go to the right of A 1, then, diagonal, then right,then,diagonal,repeat 1 more time to get B

  14. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Use adjacent matrix to find them out. It works also

  15. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Why not diagonal? Since it is = right+ vertical up.?

  16. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    answer is 210 for 1st one

  17. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    the path has to along the lines can't jump diagonally

  18. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Ohoh, so I'm wrong, hehe.

  19. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440285501178:dw| an example

  20. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    Yes that is right, there is some algorithm that will tell you.

  21. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    It's like a permutation with 9 objects, 3 red and 6 green. RGRGRGGGG RRRGGGGGG .... Using the multinomial theorem, the number of ways would be 9!/(6!3!)

  22. mathmath333
    • one year ago
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    thanks @mathmate ur anwers was correct

  23. mathmate
    • one year ago
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    You're welcome! :)

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