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Xaze

  • one year ago

Please help, Algebra II - Will Fan and Medal.

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  1. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    Compare the functions shown below:

  2. Xaze
    • one year ago
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  3. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    What is the correct order of the functions from least to greatest according to the average rate of change on the interval from x = -1 to x = 3?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the rate of change of that line is a constant it is the slope do you know it?

  5. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    @satellite73 Would 0.5/3 be the slope? I'm pretty bad at this, haha

  6. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    Sorry, 1.5*/3

  7. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    You have to find the slope of each function f(x), g(x), and h(x) \[A(x)= \frac{ f(b)-f(a) }{ b-a }\] this is the average rate of change |dw:1440377631421:dw|

  8. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    So what is f(3) for f(x)?

  9. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    f(3)=((3)+3)^2-2, am I doing okay, so far?

  10. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yup, exactly!

  11. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    f(3)=(9)^2-2 - > f(3)=81-2 -> 79?

  12. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Not quite, 3+3 = 6 :P

  13. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    Oh whoops... I was thinking of multiplication, for some reason.. f(3)=(6)^2-2 -> f(3)=36-2 - > f(3)=34?

  14. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yup that's good!

  15. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    now find f(-1)

  16. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    Yay! ^^

  17. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    @satellite73 hey if you want to take an image and upload it on draw which is very useful check out this guide on how to do it http://openstudy.com/users/astrophysics#/updates/55921cb5e4b0c2028eab5952 it's really quick to get it and helpful :P

  18. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440381614071:dw|

  19. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    perfect now we have \[f(x) = \frac{ 34-2 }{ 3-(-1) }\]

  20. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    \[f(x)=32/4?\]

  21. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes simplify it

  22. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    I should say m = that not f(x) xD but same thing

  23. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    16/2

  24. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    m = 34/4 = 16/2 keep going

  25. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    8/1

  26. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yup m = 8 for f(x)

  27. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440378413551:dw| what are these two points?

  28. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    We're doing g(x) now

  29. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    Computer is slowing down - sorry, sorry x-x The two points are (-1,-2) and (3,0)

  30. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yup perfect, so use \[m = \frac{ y_2-y_1 }{ x_2-x_1 }\] to find the slope |dw:1440378607899:dw| this is what it means visually

  31. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    All right... |dw:1440382384897:dw|

  32. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes! 1/2 is good

  33. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    So we have slope for f(x) = 8, g(x) = 1/2, now lets find the slope for h(x)

  34. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    Not sure how to find the slope for that one... doesn't seem to be in my notes

  35. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Just read the table and apply the formula

  36. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440379170633:dw|

  37. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    The formula \[m=y2-y1/x2-x1\]? Just making sure

  38. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    yup

  39. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    Okay, before I solve, how did you know to get (-1,14) and (3,62) from the chart? Or did you pick them randomly... and any pair you choose would give the same slope?

  40. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    No, because your question is asking for the average rate of change from x = -1 to x = 3, but it doesn't really matter, you'll get the same slope for any two points

  41. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440383049367:dw|

  42. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes! Now we have the slopes f(x) = 8, g(x) = 1/2 and h(x) = 12 now put it least to greatest and we're done

  43. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    g(x),f(x), h(x)!

  44. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Looks good :)

  45. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    Thanks so much, you're really a life-saver!

  46. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yw :)

  47. Xaze
    • one year ago
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    @Astrophysics, Do you think you can help with a few more? I'm almost finished with this test and I've got to get it submitted before midnight...

  48. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Oh this was a test...we can't help on tests sorry.

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