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anonymous

  • one year ago

help please!

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @ikram002p

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  2. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    In theoretical probability you don't consider what previously happened in the experiment (that is the experimental probability that takes into an account the experiment made)

  3. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    (Number of favorable outcomes) ÷ (Number of all possible outcomes)

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is it 1/8?

  5. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    yup sir!

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The probability that an event will occur is 1. Which of the following best describes the likelihood of the event occurring? Likely Certain Unlikely Impossible

  7. ikram002p
    • one year ago
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    can it happen ?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i think certain

  9. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    when theoretical probability is 1, `favorable outcomes / all possible outcomes =1` thus, `favorable outcomes = all possible outcomes`

  10. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    hence all possible outcomes are favorable, saying that every outcome (saying, no matter how it comes out) , it will then come out in a desired way. that is, the answer is certain. Correct!

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    At a school carnival, the diameter of the mat of a trampoline is 10 feet and the diameter of its metal frame is 12 feet. What is the length, in feet, of the metal frame that surrounds the trampoline? Use 3.14 for π and round your answer to the nearest tenth. 15.7 feet 18.9 feet 31.4 feet 37.7 feet

  12. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    Ok, you want the length of the frame or the area of the frame? For the length of the frame, it is: \(\large \displaystyle L=\pi D=(3.14)\cdot (12)=~...\)

  13. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    I mean this L (length) is really the C (circumference).

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i got 37.68 @SolomonZelman

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