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ccchristian1

  • one year ago

Who has done the language arts 3 segment 2 exam ?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    need help

  2. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    yes are you flvs student ?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i would help you but i'm not there yet. sorry.

  5. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    where are you ?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    lesson 06.06 support your argument.

  7. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    oh okay

  8. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    well can you help me or......

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i can try to.

  10. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    okay

  11. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    Kites: Birds of Glory As a rule, raptors, or birds of prey, are among the most admired and adored birds in the world. From the California condor to the snowy owl, few birds compare to the tigers of the air: the great hunters whose beauty and skill have inspired art and literature for centuries. The most glorious feathers of the peawingspan or the vibrant plumage of a bunting cannot compete with the power of a peregrine falcon or the determination of an osprey. Included in this group of hunters, however, is one bird of prey that is little known but equally impressive. The kites of the world are generally smaller than most raptors, but just as astonishing in skill and grace as any other hunter of the skies. Most people think of paper or cloth structures flown with string from the ground when the word 'kite' is used. In addition to these popular toys, kite can also refer to a type of raptor. Kites have a small head, a short beak and long narrow wings and tail. Kites can be found all over the world in mostly warm regions. Kites live on a variety of prey—from insects to small rodents or reptiles. Some kites eat only one kind of prey. Kites are generally masterful in the air and represent a group of birds that are among the most acrobatic of fliers. Two of the most familiar kites in the Southern United States are the swallow-tailed kite and the Mississippi kite. The Mississippi kite is rather plain to look at: a light brown and gray body with a buff or white colored head. But to watch a Mississippi kite fly is to watch a ballet in the air. These raptors eat primarily flying insects, so they do most of their hunting on the wing. As you might imagine, catching flying insects requires a great deal of agility and speed. If you are lucky enough to see one in flight, you will be amazed at the quick turns, graceful moves, and speedy pursuits of this bird. Look for them above large fields, especially during the summer. The swallow-tailed kite, also common in the South, is more easily identifiable and often seen flying over roads. With black wings and tail, white head and body, and a forked or swallow-like tail, this raptor is just as acrobatic as the Mississippi kite. Swallow-tailed kites like flying over highways in the summer as they can take advantage of the thermals, or columns of warmed air, that rise above the pavement. Once they have climbed to sufficient height, swallow-tails will glide, looking for snakes and reptiles and insects. They also eat small rodents, frogs, and other birds on occasion. Watching a swallow-tail fly is a lot like watching a gymnast perform a floor routine. Rarely flapping its wings, it uses its forked tail to make sharp turns, trace circles in the sky, or simply maintain a heading. Skilled, accomplished, and graceful, this bird is as entertaining as it is beautiful. Both kites are known to eat while flying, unlike most other birds of prey. This practice conserves energy and allows them to hunt almost continuously. While these kites are not listed as endangered, they are rare and in some states are listed as critical. Loss of habitat is the main reason for the decline. If you are lucky enough to see one, count yourself among the few. These magnificent birds are a sight you won't soon forget. Read this sentence from the final paragraph: These magnificent birds are a sight you won't soon forget. What is the purpose of this sentence in the paragraph? To introduce a new topic to interest readers To provide further evidence of kite acrobatics To summarize the main point of the article To support an earlier supporting detail

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i'd say D.

  13. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    A prompt—executive Bird is the Jay by Emily wingspaninson A prompt—executive Bird is the Jay— Bold as a Bailiff's1 Hymn— Brittle and Brief in quality— Warrant2 in every line— Sitting a Bough3 like a Brigadier4 Confident and straight— Much is the mien5 of him in March As a Magistrate6— legal officer legal action branch of a tree army officer (British) appearance judge I Heard a Bird Sing By Oliver Herford I heard a bird sing In the dark of December. A magical thing And sweet to remember. "We are nearer to Spring Than we were in September,” I heard a bird sing In the dark of December. Read both poems. What literary device is used throughout the poems? Alliteration Hyperbole Pun Metaphor

  14. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    @Babyyy_Girl_Is_The_Queen

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    C

  16. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    you sure?

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yea.

  18. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    When you are reviewing the style of an essay, what are you looking for? Correct use of capitalization Clear organization of ideas Correct punctuation and grammar Correct use of formal language

  19. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    A prompt—executive Bird is the Jay by Emily wingspaninson A prompt—executive Bird is the Jay— Bold as a Bailiff's1 Hymn— Brittle and Brief in quality— Warrant2 in every line— Sitting a Bough3 like a Brigadier4 Confident and straight— Much is the mien5 of him in March As a Magistrate6— legal officer legal action branch of a tree army officer (British) appearance judge I Heard a Bird Sing By Oliver Herford I heard a bird sing In the dark of December. A magical thing And sweet to remember. "We are nearer to Spring Than we were in September,” I heard a bird sing In the dark of December. Review the two poems. The topic is the same in both poems, but how are the themes different in each? wingspaninson’s theme is Jays are like officers and Hereford’s theme is birdsong brings us joy. wingspaninson’s theme is Jays are pretty and Hereford’s theme is seasons change. wingspaninson’s theme is Jays are confident and Hereford’s theme is birdsong is nice. wingspaninson’s theme is Jays sit in trees and Hereford’s theme is I heard a bird.

  20. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    @Babyyy_Girl_Is_The_Queen

  21. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    @flybirdfly

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    First one is C.

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Second one is B.

  24. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armor-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. “What’s happened to me?” he thought. It wasn’t a dream. Gregor then turned to look out the window at the dull weather. Drops of rain could be heard hitting the pane, which made him feel quite sad. “How about if I sleep a little bit longer and forget all this nonsense,” he thought, but that was something he was unable to do because he was used to sleeping on his right, and in his present state couldn’t get into that position. However hard he threw himself onto his right, he always rolled back to where he was. He must have tried it a hundred times, shut his eyes so that he wouldn’t have to look at the floundering legs, and only stopped when he began to feel a mild, dull pain there that he had never felt before. There was a cautious knock at the door near his head. “Gregor,” somebody called—it was his mother—“it’s quarter to seven. Didn’t you want to go somewhere?” Gregor was shocked when he heard his own voice answering, it could hardly be recognized as the voice he had had before. As if from deep inside him, there was a painful and uncontrollable squeaking mixed in with it, the words could be made out at first but then there was a sort of echo which made them unclear. Gregor had wanted to give a full answer and explain everything, but in the circumstances contented himself with saying: Yes, mother, yes, thank-you, I’m getting up now.“ Review the excerpt from the story “Metamorphosis” and answer the question below: Based on the details in the bolded paragraph, what does Gregor most want to do? Sleep more Get up Be human Answer mother

  25. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    @Babyyy_Girl_Is_The_Queen

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    C

  27. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armor-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. “What’s happened to me?” he thought. It wasn’t a dream. Gregor then turned to look out the window at the dull weather. Drops of rain could be heard hitting the pane, which made him feel quite sad. “How about if I sleep a little bit longer and forget all this nonsense,” he thought, but that was something he was unable to do because he was used to sleeping on his right, and in his present state couldn’t get into that position. However hard he threw himself onto his right, he always rolled back to where he was. He must have tried it a hundred times, shut his eyes so that he wouldn’t have to look at the floundering legs, and only stopped when he began to feel a mild, dull pain there that he had never felt before. There was a cautious knock at the door near his head. “Gregor,” somebody called—it was his mother—“it’s quarter to seven. Didn’t you want to go somewhere?” Gregor was shocked when he heard his own voice answering, it could hardly be recognized as the voice he had had before. As if from deep inside him, there was a painful and uncontrollable squeaking mixed in with it, the words could be made out at first but then there was a sort of echo which made them unclear. Gregor had wanted to give a full answer and explain everything, but in the circumstances contented himself with saying: Yes, mother, yes, thank-you, I’m getting up now.“ Review the excerpt from the story “Metamorphosis” and answer the question below: Which sentence from the story most strongly shows the reader Gregor’s mood? Drops of rain could be heard hitting the pane, which made him feel quite sad. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. Gregor was shocked when he heard his own voice answering, it could hardly be recognized as the voice he had had before. He lay on his armor-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections.

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i would help but im not taking that class..

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A

  30. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armor-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. “What’s happened to me?” he thought. It wasn’t a dream. Gregor then turned to look out the window at the dull weather. Drops of rain could be heard hitting the pane, which made him feel quite sad. “How about if I sleep a little bit longer and forget all this nonsense,” he thought, but that was something he was unable to do because he was used to sleeping on his right, and in his present state couldn’t get into that position. However hard he threw himself onto his right, he always rolled back to where he was. He must have tried it a hundred times, shut his eyes so that he wouldn’t have to look at the floundering legs, and only stopped when he began to feel a mild, dull pain there that he had never felt before. There was a cautious knock at the door near his head. “Gregor,” somebody called—it was his mother—“it’s quarter to seven. Didn’t you want to go somewhere?” Gregor was shocked when he heard his own voice answering, it could hardly be recognized as the voice he had had before. As if from deep inside him, there was a painful and uncontrollable squeaking mixed in with it, the words could be made out at first but then there was a sort of echo which made them unclear. Gregor had wanted to give a full answer and explain everything, but in the circumstances contented himself with saying: Yes, mother, yes, thank-you, I’m getting up now.“ Read these lines from the excerpt again: He must have tried it a hundred times, shut his eyes so that he wouldn’t have to look at the floundering legs, and only stopped when he began to feel a mild, dull pain there that he had never felt before. What does the phrase shut his eyes tell the reader about how Gregor feels about his appearance? Gregor is proud Gregor is disgusted Gregor wants to show off Gregor feels curious

  31. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    what grade do you have in the class @Babyyy_Girl_Is_The_Queen

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    B to the question, And i have a C in the class right now until the teacher grades my work.

  33. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    oh alright

  34. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    Kites: Birds of Glory As a rule, raptors, or birds of prey, are among the most admired and adored birds in the world. From the California condor to the snowy owl, few birds compare to the tigers of the air: the great hunters whose beauty and skill have inspired art and literature for centuries. The most glorious feathers of the peawingspan or the vibrant plumage of a bunting cannot compete with the power of a peregrine falcon or the determination of an osprey. Included in this group of hunters, however, is one bird of prey that is little known but equally impressive. The kites of the world are generally smaller than most raptors, but just as astonishing in skill and grace as any other hunter of the skies. Most people think of paper or cloth structures flown with string from the ground when the word 'kite' is used. In addition to these popular toys, kite can also refer to a type of raptor. Kites have a small head, a short beak and long narrow wings and tail. Kites can be found all over the world in mostly warm regions. Kites live on a variety of prey—from insects to small rodents or reptiles. Some kites eat only one kind of prey. Kites are generally masterful in the air and represent a group of birds that are among the most acrobatic of fliers. Two of the most familiar kites in the Southern United States are the swallow-tailed kite and the Mississippi kite. The Mississippi kite is rather plain to look at: a light brown and gray body with a buff or white colored head. But to watch a Mississippi kite fly is to watch a ballet in the air. These raptors eat primarily flying insects, so they do most of their hunting on the wing. As you might imagine, catching flying insects requires a great deal of agility and speed. If you are lucky enough to see one in flight, you will be amazed at the quick turns, graceful moves, and speedy pursuits of this bird. Look for them above large fields, especially during the summer. The swallow-tailed kite, also common in the South, is more easily identifiable and often seen flying over roads. With black wings and tail, white head and body, and a forked or swallow-like tail, this raptor is just as acrobatic as the Mississippi kite. Swallow-tailed kites like flying over highways in the summer as they can take advantage of the thermals, or columns of warmed air, that rise above the pavement. Once they have climbed to sufficient height, swallow-tails will glide, looking for snakes and reptiles and insects. They also eat small rodents, frogs, and other birds on occasion. Watching a swallow-tail fly is a lot like watching a gymnast perform a floor routine. Rarely flapping its wings, it uses its forked tail to make sharp turns, trace circles in the sky, or simply maintain a heading. Skilled, accomplished, and graceful, this bird is as entertaining as it is beautiful. Both kites are known to eat while flying, unlike most other birds of prey. This practice conserves energy and allows them to hunt almost continuously. While these kites are not listed as endangered, they are rare and in some states are listed as critical. Loss of habitat is the main reason for the decline. If you are lucky enough to see one, count yourself among the few. These magnificent birds are a sight you won't soon forget. Read this section of the text: Rarely flapping its wings, it uses its forked tail to make sharp turns, trace circles in the sky, or simply maintain a heading. Skilled, accomplished, and graceful, this bird is as entertaining as it is beautiful. Which words from the sentence give clues to the meaning of accomplished? Maintain, skilled, graceful Rarely, sharp, trace Flapping, forked, simply Graceful, entertaining, beautiful

  35. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    @Babyyy_Girl_Is_The_Queen

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A

  37. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    Kites: Birds of Glory As a rule, raptors, or birds of prey, are among the most admired and adored birds in the world. From the California condor to the snowy owl, few birds compare to the tigers of the air: the great hunters whose beauty and skill have inspired art and literature for centuries. The most glorious feathers of the peawingspan or the vibrant plumage of a bunting cannot compete with the power of a peregrine falcon or the determination of an osprey. Included in this group of hunters, however, is one bird of prey that is little known but equally impressive. The kites of the world are generally smaller than most raptors, but just as astonishing in skill and grace as any other hunter of the skies. Most people think of paper or cloth structures flown with string from the ground when the word 'kite' is used. In addition to these popular toys, kite can also refer to a type of raptor. Kites have a small head, a short beak and long narrow wings and tail. Kites can be found all over the world in mostly warm regions. Kites live on a variety of prey—from insects to small rodents or reptiles. Some kites eat only one kind of prey. Kites are generally masterful in the air and represent a group of birds that are among the most acrobatic of fliers. Two of the most familiar kites in the Southern United States are the swallow-tailed kite and the Mississippi kite. The Mississippi kite is rather plain to look at: a light brown and gray body with a buff or white colored head. But to watch a Mississippi kite fly is to watch a ballet in the air. These raptors eat primarily flying insects, so they do most of their hunting on the wing. As you might imagine, catching flying insects requires a great deal of agility and speed. If you are lucky enough to see one in flight, you will be amazed at the quick turns, graceful moves, and speedy pursuits of this bird. Look for them above large fields, especially during the summer. The swallow-tailed kite, also common in the South, is more easily identifiable and often seen flying over roads. With black wings and tail, white head and body, and a forked or swallow-like tail, this raptor is just as acrobatic as the Mississippi kite. Swallow-tailed kites like flying over highways in the summer as they can take advantage of the thermals, or columns of warmed air, that rise above the pavement. Once they have climbed to sufficient height, swallow-tails will glide, looking for snakes and reptiles and insects. They also eat small rodents, frogs, and other birds on occasion. Watching a swallow-tail fly is a lot like watching a gymnast perform a floor routine. Rarely flapping its wings, it uses its forked tail to make sharp turns, trace circles in the sky, or simply maintain a heading. Skilled, accomplished, and graceful, this bird is as entertaining as it is beautiful. Both kites are known to eat while flying, unlike most other birds of prey. This practice conserves energy and allows them to hunt almost continuously. While these kites are not listed as endangered, they are rare and in some states are listed as critical. Loss of habitat is the main reason for the decline. If you are lucky enough to see one, count yourself among the few. These magnificent birds are a sight you won't soon forget. Read this section of the text: The kites of the world are generally smaller than most raptors, but just as astonishing in skill and grace as any other hunter of the skies. What does astonishing mean in this sentence? Appalling Amazing Dreadful Predictable

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    B

  39. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka One morning, when Gregor Samsa woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. He lay on his armor-like back, and if he lifted his head a little he could see his brown belly, slightly domed and divided by arches into stiff sections. The bedding was hardly able to cover it and seemed ready to slide off any moment. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, waved about helplessly as he looked. “What’s happened to me?” he thought. It wasn’t a dream. Gregor then turned to look out the window at the dull weather. Drops of rain could be heard hitting the pane, which made him feel quite sad. “How about if I sleep a little bit longer and forget all this nonsense”, he thought, but that was something he was unable to do because he was used to sleeping on his right, and in his present state couldn’t get into that position. However hard he threw himself onto his right, he always rolled back to where he was. He must have tried it a hundred times, shut his eyes so that he wouldn’t have to look at the floundering legs, and only stopped when he began to feel a mild, dull pain there that he had never felt before. There was a cautious knock at the door near his head. “Gregor,” somebody called—it was his mother—“it’s quarter to seven. Didn’t you want to go somewhere?” Gregor was shocked when he heard his own voice answering, it could hardly be recognized as the voice he had had before. As if from deep inside him, there was a painful and uncontrollable squeaking mixed in with it, the words could be made out at first but then there was a sort of echo which made them unclear. Gregor had wanted to give a full answer and explain everything, but in the circumstances contented himself with saying: “Yes, mother, yes, thank-you, I’m getting up now.” Review the excerpt from the story “Metamorphosis” and answer the question below: Gregor wakes up to find himself transformed. Do you think this was a dream or not? In two to three sentences, explain your answer. Use evidence from the text to support your answer.

  40. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    send this answer on messages

  41. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    like send it through the message not the post

  42. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    @Babyyy_Girl_Is_The_Queen

  43. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i'm not sure about this one.

  44. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    oh okay

  45. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    Kites: Birds of Glory As a rule, raptors, or birds of prey, are among the most admired and adored birds in the world. From the California condor to the snowy owl, few birds compare to the tigers of the air: the great hunters whose beauty and skill have inspired art and literature for centuries. The most glorious feathers of the peawingspan or the vibrant plumage of a bunting cannot compete with the power of a peregrine falcon or the determination of an osprey. Included in this group of hunters, however, is one bird of prey that is little known but equally impressive. The kites of the world are generally smaller than most raptors, but just as astonishing in skill and grace as any other hunter of the skies. Most people think of paper or cloth structures flown with string from the ground when the word 'kite' is used. In addition to these popular toys, kite can also refer to a type of raptor. Kites have a small head, a short beak and long narrow wings and tail. Kites can be found all over the world in mostly warm regions. Kites live on a variety of prey—from insects to small rodents or reptiles. Some kites eat only one kind of prey. Kites are generally masterful in the air and represent a group of birds that are among the most acrobatic of fliers. Two of the most familiar kites in the Southern United States are the swallow-tailed kite and the Mississippi kite. The Mississippi kite is rather plain to look at: a light brown and gray body with a buff or white colored head. But to watch a Mississippi kite fly is to watch a ballet in the air. These raptors eat primarily flying insects, so they do most of their hunting on the wing. As you might imagine, catching flying insects requires a great deal of agility and speed. If you are lucky enough to see one in flight, you will be amazed at the quick turns, graceful moves, and speedy pursuits of this bird. Look for them above large fields, especially during the summer. The swallow-tailed kite, also common in the South, is more easily identifiable and often seen flying over roads. With black wings and tail, white head and body, and a forked or swallow-like tail, this raptor is just as acrobatic as the Mississippi kite. Swallow-tailed kites like flying over highways in the summer as they can take advantage of the thermals, or columns of warmed air, that rise above the pavement. Once they have climbed to sufficient height, swallow-tails will glide, looking for snakes and reptiles and insects. They also eat small rodents, frogs, and other birds on occasion. Watching a swallow-tail fly is a lot like watching a gymnast perform a floor routine. Rarely flapping its wings, it uses its forked tail to make sharp turns, trace circles in the sky, or simply maintain a heading. Skilled, accomplished, and graceful, this bird is as entertaining as it is beautiful. Both kites are known to eat while flying, unlike most other birds of prey. This practice conserves energy and allows them to hunt almost continuously. While these kites are not listed as endangered, they are rare and in some states are listed as critical. Loss of habitat is the main reason for the decline. If you are lucky enough to see one, count yourself among the few. These magnificent birds are a sight you won't soon forget. What are the key differences between swallow-tail and Mississippi kites? Use details and quotations from the text to support your answer.

  46. ccchristian1
    • one year ago
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    send the answer through the messages

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