anonymous
  • anonymous
describe how to graph a piecewise-defined function.
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@campbell_st
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
Well.... do you know how to graph a function?
anonymous
  • anonymous
explain using graphs and words

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More answers

e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
Well, if you know how to do a graph, a piecewise one is just graphing the pieces.
anonymous
  • anonymous
no i don't
anonymous
  • anonymous
i am a beginner
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
Hmmm... well, do yo know how say \(x^2\) is a parabola on a graph?
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1440462346722:dw|
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
well a parking station is an example of a piece wise graph or the cost of posting items there are limits for different conditions... e.g Parking fees free 0 < time <= 1 hour $1 1 < time < = 2 hours $3 2 < time <- 4 hours $10 time > 4 hours |dw:1440462065082:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
that is understandable
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
Sortof... And how y=x is just a line at a 45 degree angle that passes through 0. A piecewise is defined by some rules, so if I say: \(x^2 \text{ for } x \le 0\) \(x \text{ for } x > 0\) Then it is just both the parabola and the line and where they meet: |dw:1440462351205:dw|
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
so in extending this idea you can have |dw:1440462312993:dw|
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
Here is better view of my graph: https://www.desmos.com/calculator/qduk9fxrbk
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
x^3! That is way up there. LOL.... but as campbell_st is pointing out, it also means they do not need to touch. https://www.desmos.com/calculator/6hl6ntxydl That is a graph of his last one.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ohh
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
If you look at that graph, you will see the x^3 part does not start until y=64! So between y= a little less than 16 to y=63.999999999999 etc. there is just no y values at all.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@e.mccormick
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1440463601392:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
so are those related to the car parking example
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Nnesha
anonymous
  • anonymous
are those related to the car parking example
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1440463703158:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
@e.mccormick
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
No, he did a different example to show some options. That is why I did the graph of that one on desmos as the last graph I did.
anonymous
  • anonymous
what are the intervals of the park station example
anonymous
  • anonymous
@e.mccormick
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1440464506395:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
what are the intervals of the graph
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
That part: Parking fees free 0 < time <= 1 hour $1 1 < time < = 2 hours $3 2 < time <- 4 hours $10 time > 4 hours
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
I am saying that those are the intervals he graphed.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1440465233293:dw| what is that arrow?
anonymous
  • anonymous
what is that arrow
anonymous
  • anonymous
@e.mccormick
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
It keeps going.
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1440465386630:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
i want the intervals to be written like that
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
$10 time > 4 hours The > means, "From this point and one second more on to it stays there forever, it is $10." So on the graph you use an arrow.
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
that is the other one I graphed.
anonymous
  • anonymous
how do we identify the intervals
anonymous
  • anonymous
what is the domain for the example
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1440465552670:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
what is the domain?
anonymous
  • anonymous
domain and range?
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
The domain is the valid set of input variables. So, what is the minimum ammount of time you can park a car?
anonymous
  • anonymous
1 hr
anonymous
  • anonymous
yup it is 1hr
anonymous
  • anonymous
for 1 hr it is free
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
Nope. It has 0 there... so if a person pulls in, urns arounf, and leaves they have parked for 0 time.
anonymous
  • anonymous
so the domain is x=0
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
Starts at 0. It ends at the maximum time you can park.
anonymous
  • anonymous
x=infinite
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
fyi: It is normally done with a brace: \(f(x)\begin{cases} 2x+3 & \text{, } x<0 \\ x^2 & \text{, } x\le x < 4 \\ x^3 & \text{, } x\ge 4 \end{cases} \)
anonymous
  • anonymous
can you write the steps of graphing the piece wise function?
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
So the domain is from 0 to infinity.
anonymous
  • anonymous
so the domain is the braces one?
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
The steps are the same as any graph, but there are restrictions on how long you need to draw each part. The domain can be written several ways. You might use the union/intersection signs (cup and cap), or you might use interval notation or you might write it out long hand... depends on what the instructor wants.
anonymous
  • anonymous
the question is "In your own words, describe how to graph a piecewise-defined function."
anonymous
  • anonymous
so plzz help
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
Like I said, you graph each part, but you need to keep track of where you start and stop.
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
http://www.coolmath.com/algebra/21-advanced-graphing/03-piecewise-functions-01
anonymous
  • anonymous
but, the braces one is the domain right?
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
Yes. So \([0, \infty)\) for domain. The range would be set in that example. There are only 4 y values.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
(0,1,3,10)
anonymous
  • anonymous
that is the range right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
set of y values
anonymous
  • anonymous
can you do the other problem for me?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I tagged you
e.mccormick
  • e.mccormick
That is the correct range.

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