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anonymous

  • one year ago

WILL FAN AND MEDAL PLEASE HELP.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @hick4life

  3. hick4life
    • one year ago
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    ok lets see here

  4. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    arc length = radius * angle angle must be in radians convert 315 to radians by multiplying by pi/180

  5. hick4life
    • one year ago
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    My best option is going to be is the 3 because you have to simplify and so i did that so your answer is the 3rd one so would pick it

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    IT wasn't 3.5pi. what are the steps you used? And @dumbcow I didn't fully understand your explanation

  7. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    ok the length of the arc can be found by multiplying the radius by the measure of the angle. the angle is given in degrees, however it MUST be in radians to get the right answer to convert degrees to radians, you use the fact that 180 degrees equal pi radians \[\frac{radians}{degrees} = \frac{\pi}{180} \rightarrow radians = (\frac{\pi}{180})*degrees\]

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So 3.14 divided by 180 * 315??

  9. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    yes, however dont use 3.14 for pi notice all the answers have pi in them

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay, so 180*315=56700 from there what would I do?

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    And is it always 180?

  12. hick4life
    • one year ago
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    Yes thats the answer 180 since you divided it by the 3.14 correct

  13. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    @hick4life , stop trolling ... you are not helping

  14. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    @WhatEven , yes its always 180 .... however you multiplied not divided 180 is in the denominator ----> (315/180)*pi

  15. hick4life
    • one year ago
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    @Dumbcow just no dude no dont go there

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Meh, Okay. Well once I have 56700 what do I do? @LunyMoony could you shed some light on the situation?

  17. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    @WhatEven , yes its always 180 .... however you multiplied not divided 180 is in the denominator ----> (315/180)*pi

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay but when I multiply 180 by 315 I get 56700...

  19. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    @WhatEven , yes its always 180 .... however you multiplied not DIVIDED 180 is in the DENOMINATOR ----> (315/180)*pi \[\frac{315}{180} \pi\]

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ohhhhh. Sorry I read it wrong :c

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    And I get 1.75 with that...

  22. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    multiply by radius \[arc = radius* \text{\angle}\] \[arc = 4* \frac{315}{180} \pi\]

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay, I think I understand now. Thanks (:

  24. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    yw :)

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Would you double check my other answers so I know I'm right @dumbcow?

  26. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    sure

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So I got 1.5 with the equation for this one and it's not an option....

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  28. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    you are right .... just change it into a fraction

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So 3/2 pi???

  30. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    yep

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay, so they changed up the question a bit. I'm going to close this one and post a new one. Would you still be willing to help? (:

  32. dumbcow
    • one year ago
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    sure, it will still be same steps remember ---> radius*(angle/180)pi

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