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anonymous

  • one year ago

Need help (fixed)

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Nnesha

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    need help anyone

  4. KyanTheDoodle
    • one year ago
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    I'd love to help but I have no idea how this stuff works, but I must make my exit note-worthy. Amaaaaaaaaazzziiiiiing graaaaaaaaaccceeeee. Algebraaaaaaaaaaaa isn't coooooooooooool. And neither are fractioooooooooooooooooooooooooooooonnnnnnnnssssss.

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    does anyone know how to do it :,(

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Can you paste the words into the chat

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it wont let me

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Here's a useful tip for Venn-diagram-counting problems like this one: Start with the most inclusive sets. What I mean by that is that you can tackle this question by first considering the set that contains elements that belong to all (or most) of the three given sets, which in this case would be \(A\cap B\cap C\). You know it contains \(5\) elements. Another set that's very inclusive is \(A'\cap B'\cap C'\), which has elements that don't belong to any of \(A,B,C\). You're told it has \(22\) elements. So from this info, you can gather the following: |dw:1440549175807:dw| Does that make sense?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Now consider the next most inclusive set - there are a few of these, so let's just pick \(A\cap C\) as an example. We're told that that it contains \(14\) elements. But notice that some of the elements of \(A\cap C\) were already counted in \(A\cap B\cap C\), since \(A\cap C\subseteq A\cap B\cap C\) (subset, if you're not familiar with the symbol). So to avoid double counting, we'll need to subtract. \[|A\cap C|=n(A\cap C)-n(A\cap B\cap C)=14-5=11\] where \(|S|\) is used to denote the size of the set \(S\) and \(S\) only. Not to be confused with \(n(S)\), which means the number of elements that belong to \(S\), but might also belong to other sets containing \(S\). (If that's confusing, I'll try to elaborate.) |dw:1440549783570:dw|

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