HELP WILL MEDAL AND FAN! Find the area of the circle: Inner radius is 4cm, Outer radius is 9cm.

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HELP WILL MEDAL AND FAN! Find the area of the circle: Inner radius is 4cm, Outer radius is 9cm.

Mathematics
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Here are the options. A) 78.5cm^2 B) 31.4cm^2 C) 157cm^2 D) 204.1cm^2
are you trying to find the area of region between below two circles ? |dw:1440600185673:dw|
Note the area for a circle is \[A_{circle} = \pi r^2\]

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The diagram I was given asked me to figure out the area of the shaded region of the circle it showed me. The entire ring of the circle was faded in, but the middle part with the hole was not. To answer your queston yes I think.
|dw:1440600531344:dw| so like this
Yes except colored all the way in the ring part.
|dw:1440600652512:dw|
Show off!
definitely! ;)
Yes the bottom one looks like it.
there is a little trick to get that black area
do u remember how to find area of full circle ?
Nope.
you will need to know that before attempting this problem
lets do a quick problem maybe
K
Find area of region interior to below circle of radius 3 units : |dw:1440600874779:dw|
How do I set this up?
there is a direct formula look up in ur notes/google for "area of circle"
Also you can scroll up, I mentioned it above :P
I did some reading about it from a Google search which took me to a website called "Math Goodies", and after reading it still don't understand it any better then before.
Well the area of a circle is \[A=\pi r^2\] I guess if you want to know more about it watch this video https://www.khanacademy.org/math/geometry/basic-geometry/circum_area_circles/v/circles-radius-diameter-and-circumference And for your question the Shaded area = area of outer shape – area of inner shape
So I would multiply 4cm and 9cm by 3.14r1 and 3.14r2?
r is the radius
I know, so what do I do first.
You just have to plug it into the formula \[A = (4)^2\pi\]
And do the same for the r = 9 then subtract it from your area with r = 4
How would I enter pi into the computer? The calculator I'm using is on the computer, and it does not have a pi symbol.
Use 3.14 unless your question states otherwise there are also many calculators online you can use, http://www.wolframalpha.com/
Thank you I figured it out!
Yw

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