A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

A normal force of 38 newtons acts on a book lying on a table. If the coefficient of static friction is 1.2, what is the minimum applied force required to slide the book?

  • This Question is Open
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i dont understand this my teacher doesnt even teach physics so this doesnt help me at all i need help and im in an alternative school thats why she doesnt know how to do this cause shes only a biology teacher not physics or chemistry

  2. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the friction force which is action on your book, is parallel to the surface of the table, and its magnitude, R, is given by the subsequent formula: \[\Large R = \mu \left( {F + mg} \right)\] where \mu is the friction coefficient, m is the mass of the book, and F is the normal force

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well I cant speak to your teacher, but physics is best learned by doing problems. First step, DRAW A DIAGRAM. Any time you are doing force problems a diagram is absolutely essential to make sure you properly understand the situations, don't just say you do, show it to yourself. Second, once you have a full picture draw a force diagram.... basically just a dot with all the relevant forces (drawn as arrow away from the point and point in the direction of the force) acting on it. You should have the weight down and the normal force up. Your pushing on the book and its not moving.... clearly something has to be resisting your push. How could you turn that into a mathematical statement? I strongly recommend actually doing the experiment with a real book and experience it.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Here is a place to learn a little more about friction: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/frict.html

  5. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.