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Lena772

  • one year ago

Determine the osmotic pressure (in atm) , at 80.2 o F, of an aqueous Iron (II) nitrate solution whose mole fraction of solute is 0.002696. Density solution = 1.11 g/mL

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  1. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    PV= nRT So Posm = nRT/V R= 0.08206 L*atm/mol*k T= 80.2F = 299.928 K V = calculate somehow using density n = reverse mole fraction calculation to find total moles of solution

  2. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    @taramgrant0543664 @photon336 Can you guys assist me in reversing the mole fraction equation to find total moles of solution and then using that calculation with the density to find volume?

  3. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    V=m/d where v is volume, m is mass and d is density

  4. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    right, but i can't find the mass of the solution until i reverse the mole fraction and find moles of total solution

  5. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    I think? Mole fraction = (moles solute) / (moles solute + moles solv ). We are given moles of solute, but I don't know where to go from here. :(

  6. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Yes that is the formula

  7. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    You're not given moles of solvent?

  8. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    @Abhisar @pooja195 @zepdrix @abb0t

  9. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    Nope. :/

  10. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Hmmm... I don't know to tell you sorry I've only touched on osmotic pressure stuff none of my profs or teachers really talked much about it so I don't want to lead you on the wrong direction

  11. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    Do you know anyone online that can help me? @taramgrant0543664

  12. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    I think you got a majority of the ones that could hopefully help

  13. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    @abb0t Do you think you can help me?

  14. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    @NoelGreco Hi! Can you please help me?

  15. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    @Lena772 can you find out molality ?

  16. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    yes moles solute/kg solvent. But I don't know the moles of solute.

  17. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    Here is a formula :- \[\large \bf Molality=\frac{X_{solute}\times 1000 }{(1-X_{solute}) \times M_{solvent}}\]

  18. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    and then use this :- \[\large \bf Molarity=\frac{molality \times density \times 1000}{molality \times Molar~ mass~ of~ solute+1000}\]

  19. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    hope you can find molarity

  20. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    Molal = (0.002696 mol Solute * 1000) / ( 0.997304 * molality of solvent) , BUT idk the molality of the solvent

  21. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    its molar mass of solvent

  22. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    not molality of the solvent Remember molality is denoted by small m i.e `m`

  23. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    Molal = (0.002696 mol Solute * 1000) / ( 0.997304 * 175.8948)

  24. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    after you find out molarity ! Use this :- \[\large \bf Osmotic~Pressure(\pi)=Molarity \times RT \times vant~hoff~factor\]

  25. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    0.015368778 molal ?

  26. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    i don't know. Use calculator

  27. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    i am here to give you HINTS as possible

  28. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    molality = 0.94396197 0.94396197 * 0.08206 * 299.928 K * van hoult?

  29. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    you don't know vant hoff factor ?

  30. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    denoted by `i`

  31. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    @Lena772 then first learn this term and then solve the rest of question

  32. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    any problem ???

  33. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    Would the factor be 4 because there is 3 pieces of iron nitrate and 1 piece of water molecule?

  34. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    @mayankdevnani

  35. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    nope ! try again

  36. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    What's wrong about it?

  37. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    see the oxidation state of iron in question. You took the oxidation state as +3

  38. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    So van hoff is 3 ?

  39. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    yup

  40. Lena772
    • one year ago
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    I get 69.7 atm. That's sounds extreme. Can you just plug those in and see if you get the same value?

  41. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    lol but i don't have much time to solve ! Sorry ! Better luck ,Next time

  42. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    i have to go now ! Bye ! @Lena772 Its been a nice time with you ! :)

  43. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    MEDAL for your HARDWORK and keen interest on solving this question !

  44. mayankdevnani
    • one year ago
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    REMEMBER :- Don't suppose that i am a professor, i am (18)-

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