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thewalkingdeadrick

  • one year ago

Which is generated by movements of tectonic plates? A. seismic waves B. ocean currents C. volcanoes D. earth's magnetic field

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  1. thewalkingdeadrick
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    @iambatman @sammixboo

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    @Michele_Laino

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    @THEHELPER123

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    @Nnesha

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    i think its a am i right

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    • one year ago
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    hold on im thinking

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    http://prntscr.com/89k39o

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    I'm sorry I don't know your answer, since I have studied physics

  9. IrishBoy123
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    A

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Seismic waves are generated by the plates rubbing against one another... Rock is quite hard and unlike many other common materials when two plates rub up against one another, initially, they dont move. This causes a tremendous amount of stress to build up until the point when the rock itself is no longer strong enough to resist it. When this happens it suddenly shifts, releasing the built up energy. This is what we refer to as an earthquake. Ocean currents are quite complicated, but are not driven by plate tectonics. Everything from surface winds, warm water rising, cold water sinking, differences in salinity resulting in density differences are responsible for driving currents (though varying in degree), but not plate tectonics. The motions of the plates are far to slow to drive these things. Though in some instances earthquakes can cause tsunamis, these are not currents. Volcanoes are caused by magma pooling in underground magma chambers in the crust extending backwards into the mantle. Magma is driven by intense pressure upwards from thermal current within the mantle, and, over the course of time, the pressure in the magma chamber eventually exceeds the strength of the rock above it in the crust and it explodes violently outward which relieves the pressure. Earth's magnetic field is believed to be caused by a dynamo effect which exists in the outer core. It is believed to be composed mostly of liquid metal (mostly iron and nickel); which churns and swirls due to convection currents, driven by the temperature difference between the inner core and the mantle, and various other factors (such as density differences in particular regions to the Earth's rotation causing a Coriolis effect). All this motion, of what is essentially a fairly good conductor, induces currents (for reasons that are slightly more complicated than I am willing to try and explain here), which flow around the outer core. These currents have associated magnetic fields, and, in addition to the fact that iron and nickel are both ferromagnetic, the net result is a coupling of these magnetic fields which serve to amplify, align, and "freeze" in the magnitude and direction of this field. Now of course, this is speculative since no one has actually been there; but it seems to be consistent with the dynamics of materials we have seen and do understand. Also, the final paragraph amounts to a drastic simplification so take it with a grain of salt. Final note, the "freezing in" effect is not a permanent one. In general the field is fairly stable and resistant to small changes; however it does fluctuate in magnitude and direction in the medium term, and in the long term (geological time scales) it has been known to undergo reversal. I

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