A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

in covalent bonds which of these bonds are polar? N-H, C=O, C-N, O-P

  • This Question is Open
  1. Rushwr
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I think it should be C=O

  2. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    You can look at this https://www.chem.wisc.edu/deptfiles/genchem/sstutorial/Text7/Tx71/tx71.html Polar means that there's an electronegativity difference between the atoms large enough such that theres a net dipole moment. This dipole moment means that, theres a net negative charged end on our molecule. we would also have to consider whether there's a large difference in electronegativity between the two atoms we're interested in. remember in covalent bonds you can have polar and non polar covalent too. and that has to do with electronegativity difference. If a compound has an electronegativity difference between the two atoms is less than 0.4- 1 it's most likely going to be non polar covalent and if it's greater than 1.7 it's ionic. also you need to take into account dipole-moments too. if you're dipoles cancel out in your molecule then overall your molecule is non polar. but let's look at C, and Nitrogen. I believe that for these two that, their difference in electronegativity is probably going to be less than 1 so i'm going to say that's out. also because they are relatively close to each other on the periodic table their difference should be minimal Electronegativity values; you can actually put these in on a google search. 2.55 Carbon 3.04 Nitrogen 0.49 difference Oxygen 3.44 Phosphorus 2.19 difference 1.25 Nitrogen 3.04 Hydrogen 2.2 difference 0.84 I would say that they are all polar covalent because there's a large enough difference between them.

  3. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Electronegativity difference has to be large for polar covalent bond. and I support @Photon336 answer.....

  4. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @arindameducationusc I think the question was a little ambiguous, I guess virtually all of them can be polar if you look up the values and then subtract them.

  5. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes.... even I feel the same way....I think the question should be which one is more polar.... :D

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    same, I agree with you

  7. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.