anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay I have a question, so I have two different colored eyes also known as heterochromia iridum and I was wondering what are the chances of my children having two different colored eyes? A lot of websites say its hereditary but is it something that skips a generation or? I don't know. I am just curious of the likelihood of my future children having this mutation?
Biology
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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shreehari499
  • shreehari499
Hmm..Hey! @oliviacaroline2123 ! U there?
shreehari499
  • shreehari499
Anyways..the specific disease that you're speaking of is an Autosomal Dominant Trait
shreehari499
  • shreehari499
Is your husband Affected? or not ? so that i can draw the Pedigree Chart and find out the probability of your children being affected from it. :)

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anonymous
  • anonymous
@shreehair499 Lets say my nonexistent husband didn't have it, what would be the probability then? and thank you for helping me! :)
shreehari499
  • shreehari499
Consider you to be X^cX^c (affected) and your husband XY(normal)
shreehari499
  • shreehari499
C for heterochromatia iridium
shreehari499
  • shreehari499
So crossing X^cX^c with XY we get X^cX , X^cY , X^cX and X^cY
shreehari499
  • shreehari499
So this shows that both your daughters will not be affected, instead they will be carriers, buy both sons will be affected with the disease
shreehari499
  • shreehari499
*but
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Shreeehari499 That kind of makes sense but also how does gender affect it?
shreehari499
  • shreehari499
Yeah gender does come into play... Suppose your husband is affected, the probability for all your children to be affected will be 100% I.e all boys and girls become affected
anonymous
  • anonymous
You first said it was an autosomal dominant trait and then calculated probabilities as if it were a sex linked recessive trait? @shreehari499 Futhermore, it is not even always autosomal recessive, we need far more details to predict with reasonable accuracy anything about the offspring of @OliviaCaroline2123 It would be best for you if you talked about this to a genetic councelor now, or once you have a husband.
Abhisar
  • Abhisar
Hehe, as niel said it's not so simpe, \(Heterochromia~iridum\) is basically a class of disorder in which both eyes appear to have different color. It may be congenital or may be acquired. In case it is congenital, may be due to dominant, or in most cases may be a polygenic effect. it can also due to neurological disorders like in the case of weber syndrome.
shreehari499
  • shreehari499
*scratching head* Yeah right! I was wrong :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
no problem

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