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anonymous

  • one year ago

help!

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @heretohelpalways

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Read the excerpt from President Dwight D. Eisenhower's citation in Jonas Salk's honor, and answer the question that follows. Citation from President Dwight D. Eisenhower to Jonas Salk Immediate Release: April 22,1955 James C. Hagerty, Press Secretary to the President The White House Following are the Citations given today by the President to Dr. Jonas E. Salk and the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis The Citation for Dr. Salk is as follows: Because of a signal and historic contribution to human welfare by Dr. Jonas E. Salk in his development of a vaccine to prevent paralytic poliomyelitis, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States, present to him this citation for his extraordinary achievement. The work of Dr. Salk is in the highest tradition of selfless and dedicated medical research. He has provided a means for the control of a dread disease. By helping scientists in other countries with technical information; by offering to them the strains of seed virus and professional aid so that the production of vaccine can be started by them everywhere; by welcoming them to his laboratory that they may gain a fuller knowledge, Dr. Salk is a benefactor of mankind. His achievement, a credit to our entire scientific community, does honor to all the people of the United States. Answer the following question based on the President Dwight D. Eisenhower's citation: The president is proud that Dr. Salk's work is extending beyond the United States. Which of the following is not a step Dr. Salk has taken to assist foreign countries? Dr. Salk has assisted foreign countries by providing technical information. Dr. Salk has helped foreign countries begin to produce the vaccine themselves. Dr. Salk has offered foreign scientists the opportunity to tour his laboratory. Dr. Salk has traveled and given the polio vaccine to children in foreign countries.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i dont know

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you just answer them for me please really quick :)

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok next!

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Read the entry on Jonas Salk from Compton's Encyclopedia/The Britannica School Edition, and answer the question beneath the text. Compton's Encyclopedia Jonas Salk (1914-1995). For the first half of the 20th century, poliomyelitis, also known as infantile paralysis, was one of the most dreaded diseases to attack young people. By 1955 American physician and researcher Jonas Salk had developed a vaccine that almost eradicated the disease in the United States and other developed countries. Jonas Edward Salk was born in New York City on October 28, 1914. He graduated from the City College of New York in 1934 and earned his doctorate in medicine from New York University's College of Medicine in 1939. While in medical school he had worked with Thomas Francis Jr. on killed-virus immunology studies. In 1942 he joined a group at the University of Michigan working on a vaccine against influenza. The vaccine was perfected in 1953. In 1947 Salk became associate professor of bacteriology and head of the Virus Research Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. There he began working on the polio vaccine. Three viruses caused polio, and a vaccine had to be effective against all of them. By 1952 Salk had developed such a vaccine and conducted field tests on children. His findings were published in 1953, and a mass field test was done the next year. On April 12, 1955, the vaccine was released for use in the United States. In 1957 Salk was named professor of experimental medicine at Pittsburgh, and in 1963 he went to San Diego as head of the Institute (later named the Salk Institute) for Biological Studies. In 1977 Salk was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He died on June 23, 1995, in La Jolla, California. Answer the following question based on the Compton's Encyclopedia reading: Which choice best describes the biggest impact of Jonas Salk's work with poliomyelitis? Jonas Salk became a professor of medicine and the head of the Institute for Biological Studies. Jonas Salk was celebrated for his work and awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Jonas Salk created a vaccine that has nearly eliminated the disease in the United States and many other developed countries. Jonas Salk tested his vaccine on a large group of children and published his findings the following year.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    please i dont have time to look and try to find the answer because i have to go soon too! im sorry.. can you tell me the answers :)

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    b?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    its c?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Read the entry on Jonas Salk from Compton's Encyclopedia/The Britannica School Edition, and answer the question beneath the text. Compton's Encyclopedia Jonas Salk (1914-1995). For the first half of the 20th century, poliomyelitis, also known as infantile paralysis, was one of the most dreaded diseases to attack young people. By 1955 American physician and researcher Jonas Salk had developed a vaccine that almost eradicated the disease in the United States and other developed countries. Jonas Edward Salk was born in New York City on October 28, 1914. He graduated from the City College of New York in 1934 and earned his doctorate in medicine from New York University's College of Medicine in 1939. While in medical school he had worked with Thomas Francis Jr. on killed-virus immunology studies. In 1942 he joined a group at the University of Michigan working on a vaccine against influenza. The vaccine was perfected in 1953. In 1947 Salk became associate professor of bacteriology and head of the Virus Research Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. There he began working on the polio vaccine. Three viruses caused polio, and a vaccine had to be effective against all of them. By 1952 Salk had developed such a vaccine and conducted field tests on children. His findings were published in 1953, and a mass field test was done the next year. On April 12, 1955, the vaccine was released for use in the United States. In 1957 Salk was named professor of experimental medicine at Pittsburgh, and in 1963 he went to San Diego as head of the Institute (later named the Salk Institute) for Biological Studies. In 1977 Salk was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He died on June 23, 1995, in La Jolla, California. Answer the following question based on the Compton's Encyclopedia reading: Which choice best describes the reasons behind Jonas Salk's decision to search for a cure for poliomyelitis? The disease affected children in the United States all of Salk's life. The disease became an epidemic shortly after Salk became a doctor. Jonas Salk's own child contracted poliomyelitis as an infant. Jonas Salk suffered from poliomyelitis as a young child.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Read the excerpt from President Dwight D. Eisenhower's citation in Jonas Salk's honor, and answer the question that follows. Citation from President Dwight D. Eisenhower to Jonas Salk Immediate Release: April 22,1955 James C. Hagerty, Press Secretary to the President The White House Following are the Citations given today by ] the President to Dr. Jonas E. Salk and the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis The Citation for Dr. Salk is as follows: Because of a signal and historic contribution to human welfare by Dr. Jonas E. Salk in his development of a vaccine to prevent paralytic poliomyelitis, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States, present to him this citation for his extraordinary achievement. The work of Dr. Salk is in the highest tradition of selfless and dedicated medical research. He has provided a means for the control of a dread disease. By helping scientists in other countries with technical information; by offering to them the strains of seed virus and professional aid so that the production of vaccine can be started by them everywhere; by welcoming them to his laboratory that they may gain a fuller knowledge, Dr. Salk is a benefactor of mankind. His achievement, a credit to our entire scientific community, does honor to all the people of the United States. Answer the following question based on the President Dwight D. Eisenhower's citation: President Eisenhower refers to Jonas Salk's work as an "historic contribution to human welfare" and an "extraordinary achievement." President Eisenhower also calls Dr. Salk a "benefactor of mankind." What do these words and phrases express about the president's beliefs? The president believes that Dr. Salk has impressed other scientists. The president believes that Dr. Salk has made an impact on the entire world. The president believes that Dr. Salk has proven to be a dedicated doctor. The president believes that Dr. Salk has successfully achieved his goal.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    do you know anyone who is good at LA?

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    noooooooo

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'll tag someone though

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @elsa213

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    shes offline

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    anyways lets continue

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay...

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    next question

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Read the entry on Jonas Salk from Compton's Encyclopedia/The Britannica School Edition, and answer the question beneath the text. Compton's Encyclopedia Jonas Salk (1914-1995). For the first half of the 20th century, poliomyelitis, also known as infantile paralysis, was one of the most dreaded diseases to attack young people. By 1955 American physician and researcher Jonas Salk had developed a vaccine that almost eradicated the disease in the United States and other developed countries. Jonas Edward Salk was born in New York City on October 28, 1914. He graduated from the City College of New York in 1934 and earned his doctorate in medicine from New York University's College of Medicine in 1939. While in medical school he had worked with Thomas Francis Jr. on killed-virus immunology studies. In 1942 he joined a group at the University of Michigan working on a vaccine against influenza. The vaccine was perfected in 1953. In 1947 Salk became associate professor of bacteriology and head of the Virus Research Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. There he began working on the polio vaccine. Three viruses caused polio, and a vaccine had to be effective against all of them. By 1952 Salk had developed such a vaccine and conducted field tests on children. His findings were published in 1953, and a mass field test was done the next year. On April 12, 1955, the vaccine was released for use in the United States. In 1957 Salk was named professor of experimental medicine at Pittsburgh, and in 1963 he went to San Diego as head of the Institute (later named the Salk Institute) for Biological Studies. In 1977 Salk was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He died on June 23, 1995, in La Jolla, California. Answer the following question based on the Compton's Encyclopedia reading: What was one of the challenges Dr. Salk faced in his attempt to create a polio vaccine? Dr. Salk did not have enough money to pay for his research and supplies. Dr. Salk had to create one vaccine that was effective against three different viruses. Dr. Salk had to convince government officials to allow him to test the vaccine. Dr. Salk's idea for a vaccine was not supported by other scientists and physicians.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    P.S., If you read the citation, you should find all of the answers -.-

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    if you understand your flvs lessons, you should be able to do your work, so try to answer the question yourself before asking

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    If the conflict involves escaping a war-torn country, which character most likely connects with this conflict? A courageous young woman A hopeless woman A cowardly business leader A funny cousin

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I guess I could help with a few more

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok thanks :)

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    next question

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    really quick please

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    If the setting of a story is a deserted soccer field, which character most closely connects with this setting? A protagonist who is trying to find a way to help his sick neighbor A protagonist who is fighting against robots that are taking over a city A protagonist who has no real friends to count on A protagonist who time travels to the middle of a futuristic city

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is this the same test or a different test

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    different

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh, how did you do on the first test?

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i got an 80%

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    which question did you get wrong?

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ill tell you, but can we finish this test please

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sure

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no Read the beginning of the story below and consider how the characters, setting, and mood interact to drive the story forward: This was the moment Zachary had been waiting for. He had rehearsed his lines for weeks, silently in his head as he biked to school, out loud in the mirror when he was home alone, and, to get used to an audience, in front of his sister's stuffed animals and a slightly confused dog. Zachary had not prepared well for last year's audition, and at the last minute had chosen not to go—too embarrassed—or too scared—he did not know which. Now, as he stood backstage, he thought about last year. He had been so disappointed in himself as he walked home alone, snuck to his room, and flopped sadly into his bed. "Next year will be different," he vowed then and there. "I will be better prepared." And he was. He just hoped it was enough. His throat was dry, his palms were sweaty, his heart was pounding, but he was ready to face the spotlight. A hushed silence fell across the auditorium as the drama teacher called his name. Zachary Hamilton. Based on the passage, how do you think Zachary will deal with the conflict in the remainder of the story? The literary elements do not provide enough hints as to what might happen next. The literary elements suggest that Zachary is not prepared for this year's audition and will not do well. The literary elements suggest that Zachary learned from last year and will have more success this time. The literary elements suggest that Zachary will choose not to audition.

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i reallly realllyy realllllly really got to go now

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Vocaloid

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok bye :) thank you for all the help

  41. Vocaloid
    • one year ago
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    well, based on the passage, what do you think?

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