anonymous
  • anonymous
How do you determine when to use addition or subtraction when solving an absolute value inequality using a graph?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Example:
anonymous
  • anonymous
I thought distance was always supposed to be negative, but some of the answers to my questions use a positive.
LynFran
  • LynFran
no distance is always positive

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More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
The answers use negatives.
LynFran
  • LynFran
because we are talking about absolute values .... we usually get 2 answers one is positive and one is negative..
LynFran
  • LynFran
@DecentNabeel wat do u think..?
triciaal
  • triciaal
distance is always a positive unit of measure between 2 points
LynFran
  • LynFran
for absolute .... example |x+3|=5 then (x+3)=+5 and (x+3)=-5
triciaal
  • triciaal
one approach to doing absolute value problems is to split in 2 the positive and the negative solve each then find the combined solution
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm not solving an actual absolute value inequality, I am trying to write absolute value inequalities using a graph.
triciaal
  • triciaal
read again slowly
triciaal
  • triciaal
solve each and put the results on the same graph to see the final solution
anonymous
  • anonymous
There is nothing to solve. I already have the graphs, and am working backwards to find the inequality.
triciaal
  • triciaal
look at number 25
triciaal
  • triciaal
x > -12 and x< -6
freckles
  • freckles
\[\text{ assume } a \text{ is positive } \\ |x-c| \le a \text{ means we are shading the interval }[ c-a , c+a] \\ |x-c| \ge a \text{ means we are shading everything outside the interval } (c-a,c+a)\]
triciaal
  • triciaal
|dw:1440897882997:dw|
triciaal
  • triciaal
|dw:1440898166918:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't need to solve it. The answer was |x+9|<3 I need to know when to use addition or subtraction when solving from a graph.
freckles
  • freckles
\[ \text{ assume } a \text{ is positive } \\ |x-c| \le a \text{ means we are shading the interval }[ c-a , c+a] \\ |x-c| \ge a \text{ means we are shading everything outside the interval } (c-a,c+a)\] |dw:1440898355091:dw| |dw:1440898407502:dw| I have added drawings in case you didn't understood my words
freckles
  • freckles
notice in the first graph you put c=-9 and a=3 the second one you have c=1 and a=2
freckles
  • freckles
i think a couple of my a's above looks like 2's but they are a's
freckles
  • freckles
|dw:1440898758376:dw|
freckles
  • freckles
|dw:1440898823346:dw| can you guess how to represent this
anonymous
  • anonymous
|x-2|<-5
freckles
  • freckles
we have open circles so we don't want an equality thing in there at all we also want a < symbol since our shading is between the numbers now the first thing to notice is the center number which is -5 that is our c and a is how far the exterior numbers are away which is 2 |x-(-5)|<2 |x+5|<2
freckles
  • freckles
|dw:1440899046041:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[|x-3.5|\le4.5\]
freckles
  • freckles
let's try another one |dw:1440899271018:dw|*
freckles
  • freckles
you are awesome
freckles
  • freckles
I made a type-o and you still figured out
freckles
  • freckles
|dw:1440899357439:dw| yes the center number is 3.5 so you c is 3.5 and 3.5 is 4.5 units from 8 and 3.5 is 4.5 units from -1 so we have \[|x-3.5| \le 4.5\]
freckles
  • freckles
|dw:1440899526070:dw| the center number here is 5 and your a is 1 since both 4 and 6 are 1 unit from 5 \[|x-5| >1\]
freckles
  • freckles
anyways do you have any questions?
anonymous
  • anonymous
But how do you know when to write the inequality as a negative or a positive?
freckles
  • freckles
what do you mean
anonymous
  • anonymous
Like, you had |x-5|>1 and |x+5|<2 How do you know when to put negative and positive
freckles
  • freckles
we only had |x-5|>1 for previous one
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes, but how did you know to put a negative.
freckles
  • freckles
|x-(-5)|>1 would be right if -5 was at the center and to the right you had -5+1 and to the left you had -5-1 instead
freckles
  • freckles
|x-5|>1 means x-5<-1 or x-5>1 which means x<4 or x>6 |dw:1440899857523:dw|
freckles
  • freckles
|x-5|>1 looks like this: |dw:1440899886515:dw| while |x-(-5)|>1 looks like this: |dw:1440899916458:dw|
freckles
  • freckles
by the way |x-(-5)|>1 is the same as saying |x+5|>1 since -(-5)=+5
freckles
  • freckles
|x-c|<=a says we want all numbers a units away from c in both directions
freckles
  • freckles
and yes c can be a positive or negative number
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ohhhhh! I finally understand!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks for your help!
freckles
  • freckles
np

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