anonymous
  • anonymous
Write out a voter preference schedule involving 19 voters and three candidates which shows that a candidate may have a majority of the first-place votes and NOT win a borda count election
Mathematics
katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
LunyMoony
  • LunyMoony
I'm no politician haha
anonymous
  • anonymous

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Its discrete mathematics. Its interesting and different than regular math
LunyMoony
  • LunyMoony
I would have to know how one who has the most votes not necessarily wins, and what makes a win if not by majority of votes I believe
anonymous
  • anonymous
its confusing.
LunyMoony
  • LunyMoony
Yeah, it is. It takes simple math, but adds politics to the mix. So I didn't, but I hope you know your American voting system.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes and no lol
LunyMoony
  • LunyMoony
haha
anonymous
  • anonymous
I hate that they make it voting for math class like it sounds and looks like a simple math problem but when u actually do it its like whatttt.
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
so it's simply a case of the candidate A gets 8 votes, candidate B gets 6 votes and candicate C gets 5 votes... then candidate C is eliminated and the votes for candidate C are distributed between A and B after looking at the 2nd preferences... so if 5 people voted 1 for candidate C if 4 or more of those 5 people voted for candidate B, then B wins the election if 4 voted B as 2nd preference the count is A = 9 and B = 10 if 4 voted B as 2nd preference the count is A = 8 and B = 11 hope it makes sense
anonymous
  • anonymous
But thats the twist is because 19 is the number of total voters, majority has to be 10 or more for one of the candidates :/ @campbell_st
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
no the question says a candidate has a majority of 1st preference votes.... not a majority of all votes.. so if candidate A gets 8 values and B 6 votes, then A has the majority of 1st preference votes.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ohhhhh. Thank you so much!!!
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
but borda count looks at allocating points 1 point for a last place vote, 2 points for a 2nd place vote and 3 for a 1st place vote here is an explanation and example I just found http://www.ctl.ua.edu/math103/Voting/borda.htm

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