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anonymous

  • one year ago

Solve the triangle. A = 52°, b = 14, c = 6

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  1. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440977299136:dw|

  2. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    What law are you going to use?

  3. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    Law of sine will pretty much get you the answer. Any ideas of how to use the law of sine?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sin?

  5. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    will A= 14.9 C=24.2 B=103.8 ?

  7. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    The Law of Sine or the Sine rule says: \(\Large \frac{Sin(A)}{a}=\frac{Sine(B)}{b}=\frac{Sin(C)}{c}\)

  8. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    How did you get that answer @Abbs__ ?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I just plugged it in

  10. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    Can you show me your work?

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    idk how to do that, is it wrong ?

  12. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    I'm not going to give out the answer unless you participate in your question and start showing some work.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay I obviously did the work, how do I take a picture of it and send it.

  14. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    @Zale101 the law of sines won't work here yet. We need to know either B or C. To start off, use the law of cosines to solve for 'a'. After that, the law of sines can be used.

  15. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    Thanks @jim_thompson5910 !!!

  16. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    sure thing

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I literally did that tho

  18. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    @Abbs__ Jim is right, you start off by using the law of cosines, to know B or C because apparently you can't go straight ahead and do the law of sines because it wont work. Your question only shows A, then b and c. We can't have Sin(A)/a because we only know A and a is not giving, same goes for B and C. There's missing parts that's why we can't use the laws of sine. Thanks again, jim Step 1: Laws of Cosine Step 2: Laws of sine

  19. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    @Abbs__ can you then show us what you did?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I asked how to do that twice

  21. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    Law of Cosines a^2 = b^2 + c^2 - 2*b*c*cos(A) a^2 = 14^2 + 6^2 - 2*14*6*cos(52) ... make the proper substitutions now isolate 'a'

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