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pooja195

  • one year ago

Can someone help me out with #25 im not sure about this one because they dont share any common points... http://prntscr.com/8attdu @zepdrix :)

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  1. Hero
    • one year ago
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    Maybe not any common points, but do planes PQR and UVS share any common lines or segments?

  2. pooja195
    • one year ago
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    No they dont.

  3. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    look at the square that contains PQR not just those 3 points.

  4. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    same with UVS

  5. pooja195
    • one year ago
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    I take that back... U and Q are lines right?

  6. pooja195
    • one year ago
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    *a line

  7. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    PQR = PQRS QUV=QUVS

  8. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    what do they have in common?

  9. pooja195
    • one year ago
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    S

  10. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    and?

  11. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    @pooja195 Keep in mind that just like a line is infinite in both directions, a plane is an infinite flat surface. Plane UVS is being called plane UVS to show you that these three points are in the plane. The plane extends up and down and right and left infinitely.

  12. pooja195
    • one year ago
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    Q

  13. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Every point on the front surface of the prism is part of plane UVS.

  14. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    The same goes for plane PQR. Every point on the right face of the prism is part of plane PQR.

  15. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    In addition, when planes do intersect, their intersection is a line.

  16. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    right they share QS in common

  17. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1440988520418:dw|

  18. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    The figure shows intersecting planes ABC and BCD. There are arrows showing that the planes extend forever. Planes are infinitely sized flat surfaces. they have infinite length and infinite width and no height. The intersection of the planes is line BC.

  19. pooja195
    • one year ago
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    ah ok this makes a bit more sense thanks :) and i apperciate the time taken to do the drawing it helps me understand better thanks ^_^ and wow learned something new....never knew planes were infinte.... :/

  20. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    A plane is a 2-dimensional equivalent of a line, so to speak. Just like a line is infinite in length, a plane is infinite in length and width. When we draw a quadrilateral to represent a plane, we are just drawing a part of the plane; the same way that a segment with arrow heads represents a line of infinite length. With planes, it's not customary to draw arrowheads to show the plane is infinite, though.

  21. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    You're very welcome.

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