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anonymous

  • one year ago

A bird (B) is spotted flying 900 feet from an observer. The observer (O) also spots the top of a tower (T) at a height of 200 feet. What is the angle of depression from the bird (B) to the observer (O)? These are the choices: A) 12.52° B) 12.84° C) 77.16° D) 83.69°

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't want to just know the answer, I'd like to learn it. I know the sin, cos, tan functions btw. I just am a bit confused on this question.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You are given the value of 2 sides, and you want to find an angle, what trigonometric function of that angle relates the 2 sides?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That would be the sin function right?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yep

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\sin(x)=\frac{OT}{OB}\]

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    After simplifying the ratio, you can use a calculator

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay wouldn't it be sin (x) = 200/900?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yep!

  10. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    yes I am a little too! Your diagram does not appear to be right From my understanding the tower is 200 ft high - the diagram shows that the distance to the tower is 200 feet. I guess the 200 ft must be the distance from the observer to the tower

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay, then I'd divide 200 into 900 right?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Wait.. What're you saying @welshfella

  13. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    no you divide 900 into 200

  14. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    was the diagram given in the question?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\sin(x)=\frac{200}{900}=\frac{2}{9}\]

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes the wording is a little off in the question, it seems like the distance to the tower rather than it's height, but there's no need to think about it too much

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What do you mean diagram? Sorry, I'm a bit confused on what I should do now haha.. So should I just switch it around and divide 900 into 200? @welshfella @Nishant_Garg

  18. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    - but you should query it @ScienceAndMath . Math can be difficult enough without having confusing questions...

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441025224072:dw|

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay, so 200 is the distance then?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Since T is 200.

  22. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    - yes that looks like the problem. I was asking whether the picture you gave was part of the original question.

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yep, it looks like that is the case

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes, this is the exact picture for the question:

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  25. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    Oh OK then you are on right track The picture is correct but the question has an error.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay well if T is the distance should I still use the sin function for 200/900?

  27. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    yes Nishant's formula is correct

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    use a calculator to find arcsin of 200/900, make sure to convert it to degrees if it's in radians

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Let me explain what I got and maybe you guys could correct it: sin(x) = 200/900 (divide 200 into 900) = 0.2222 sin^-1 0.2222 = 12.838 x 180 divide into pi (3.14) = 735.95 But then I remember you saying that I should divide 900 into 200..

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    12.838 approximately 12.84, that's perfect you got your answer there

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it was already in degrees you didn't need to convert it

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh right, I forgot haha, the x 180 divided into pi was just another way to convert it instead of the sin^-1.

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    one way to remember if you're on right track is that sine and cosine will always give proper fractions so saying something like \[\sin(x)=\frac{900}{200}\] is totally absurd!

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh okay! So everything works out then?

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    however sine can also give 1 if the angle is 90, for angles smaller than 90 and greater than 0 it will always give a proper fraction

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yep you've done the question

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thank you for all your help!

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