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KJ4UTS

  • one year ago

A breeding group of beavers is introduced into a protected area. After t years the number of beavers in the area is modeled by the function N(t)= 54/0.35+0.68^t 1. How many beavers were initially introduced? 2. Estimate the number of beavers after 5 years. 3. Determine the change in the beaver population between t = 5 and t = 10. (Note: All answers are whole numbers.)

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  1. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    I think that the answers are (I just want to make sure): 1. 40 2. 109 3. 36.5 or 37 I think would be a whole number

  2. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    @peachpi

  3. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    N(t)= 54/0.35+0.68^0 = 40 N(t)= 54/0.35+0.68^5 = 109

  4. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    I did the question and got partial points and would like to know where I went wrong?

  5. tkhunny
    • one year ago
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    You have written \(N(t) = \dfrac{54}{0.35} + 0.68^{t}\). This appears not to be what you intend. Please write clearly.

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes the first two are correct. For the third, it looks like you found N(10) instead of the calculating the rate of change

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    rate of change = [N(10) - N(5)] / (10 - 5)

  8. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    @tkhunny sorry its N(t)= 54/(0.35+0.68^t)

  9. tkhunny
    • one year ago
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    So much better. Notation matters. Be careful.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    misread that. The don't want the rate of change, just the change. N(10) - N(5) is what you're asked for.

  11. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    how do I use N(10) - N(5) do I plug something in?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes, you plug in 5 and 10 for t. This is what you had above. N(t)= 54/(0.35+0.68^5) = 109 The N(t) should be N(5) because you substituted 5 for t. This is correct N(5)= 54/0.35+0.68^5 = 109.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So plug in 10 for t to find N(10)

  14. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    145.4979

  15. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    do I subtract the two?

  16. tkhunny
    • one year ago
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    That's N(10). What else would you do to find a change or difference?

  17. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    I am not sure? I thought it would be 145-109?

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes subtract

  19. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    if I just do 145-109=36 before I got 36.5 and rounded it to 37 and I got partial points maybe its just 36

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it seems so

  21. KJ4UTS
    • one year ago
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    ok thank you :)

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you're welcome

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