anonymous
  • anonymous
Which of the following compounds is saturated? A. C6H10 B. C7H14 C. C9H20 D. C9H14 Help! I am not sure how to do this problem...a step by step explanation would be wonderful. :)
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@dan815
Photon336
  • Photon336
Saturated compound contains a double bond if this is the first time you're doing this you may want to draw out the compound first
Photon336
  • Photon336
let's start with C6H10 Step #1 draw out the carbon backbone |dw:1441062004377:dw| Step #2 put in all the hydrogens and count them. Remember every carbon must have four bonds to it, ALWAYS.

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Photon336
  • Photon336
|dw:1441062178715:dw| NEXT we, put in all our hydrogens, we have used 10 hydrogens. BUT what do we need to finish this figure off?
Photon336
  • Photon336
because the carbons are in a RING structure, each carbon is bonded to a carbon on the left and to the right so, it has 2 bonds already. you just need to put in the hydrogens 2 for each carbon in the ring.
anonymous
  • anonymous
But the two on the left have only one hydrogen attached?
Photon336
  • Photon336
@RobinJane Yes so we must put in a double bond, so that each carbon has four bonds so it would be like this. |dw:1441062556185:dw| So now you know what saturated is right vs un saturated? a compound must not contain any double bonds for it to be saturated. |dw:1441062449685:dw| any compound that has a double bond in it is unsaturated . |dw:1441062624115:dw|
Photon336
  • Photon336
So to figure out this problem, you do the following; 1. on a piece of paper you count out the number of carbons in the formula. 2. then you place hydrogens on each carbon to make sure that the carbons have 4 bonds. 3. if you run out of hydrogens, then you would have to put in a double bond. 4. CARBON always Makes 4 bonds.
Photon336
  • Photon336
One last thing saturated compounds will have the formula CnH2n+2 if I remember correctly. So you can see if a formula is unsaturated/vs saturated whether it will have a double bond. so for C7H14 You can test this out first; like you can put in 7 and see how many hydrogens that your compound must have to be saturated. if it has less than this you know it's unsaturated. so for C7H14; you know that n =7 right? well plug it into this formula C7 2(7) + 2 = 16 C7H16 but we have C7H14 ; SO This must be unsaturated
anonymous
  • anonymous
SO it is not saturated?
Photon336
  • Photon336
nope; but why?
anonymous
  • anonymous
That makes sense... Aren't there two formulas?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Is it better to plug into the formula, or to draw it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I mean, which method is better and more accurate?
Photon336
  • Photon336
well I suggest drawing it out, because that way you get to see for yourself why it's saturated/vs un saturated. also if you take organic chem you may not be given a molecular formula like C7H2N etc... and they won't show you how it's drawn you'll have to draw it out yourself.
Photon336
  • Photon336
like C9H20 can you draw that out for me?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am trying...just a moment...
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1441063493585:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Is this right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Photon336
Photon336
  • Photon336
You're almost there, so yeah you counted the carbons, put in the hydrogens, there's just one thing it's not a ring but it's straight chained.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh!
anonymous
  • anonymous
But the idea is similar, correct?
Photon336
  • Photon336
yep. so make sure you count out all the hydrogens
anonymous
  • anonymous
So that one is unsaturated?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Let me try again...
Photon336
  • Photon336
another question i have for you was does each carbon have 4 bonds?
Photon336
  • Photon336
like whether it's a ringed structure vs straight chain that takes practice, wish I had a way to explain it but you will have to just keep seeing them
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1441064007882:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
In this one, it is saturated!
anonymous
  • anonymous
How do you do double bonds without adding more to carbon?
Photon336
  • Photon336
excellent
anonymous
  • anonymous
Is the top drawing correct?
Photon336
  • Photon336
yes that's perfect, what did you mean about the double bonds?
anonymous
  • anonymous
When it is unsaturated.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Or do you just use the drawing to establish unsaturated vs saturated?
Photon336
  • Photon336
Well in the figure you drew, that's unsaturated because there are no double bonds if it were saturated then you would have a double bond
Photon336
  • Photon336
Hope this helps
anonymous
  • anonymous
How do you draw it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Double bonds, that is?
Photon336
  • Photon336
Just when you draw the bond between the carbon place another line on top of it should look like = an equal sign. Just remember that each of your carbons has four bonds. If your carbons have four bonds each of them then you can't have a double bond there b/c then those carbons will have 5 bonds no good

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