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anonymous

  • one year ago

***PHYSICS INCLINED PLANE PROBLEM*** An object with a mass of 10 kg is initially at rest at the top of a frictionless inclined plane that rises at 30° above the horizontal. At the top, the object is initially 8.0 m from the bottom of the incline, as shown in the figure. When the object is released from this position, it eventually stops at a distanced from the bottom of the inclined plane along a horizontal surface, as shown. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the horizontal surface and the object is 0.20, and air resistance is negligible. Find the distance d

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok. This sort of question requires that you set up two equations to isolate the unknown values. In this case, they would be normal force and rate of acceleration with which you are looking to find the displacement.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    This is slightly complicated in that you have to first use the sine law to calculate the normal force or equivalently force due to gravity that is the cause of the acceleration .

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    *equivalently gravity force

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Coefficient of friction accounts for the force required to move the object, so you would multiply 0.2 with the normal force and account for the overall force at work.

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Then, you would use the newton's second law to calculate the acquired acceleration, after which you will again apply the friction to calculate from the point of the end of the incline at which decrease in velocity will be taking place .

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Good luck anyway. If you have more questions let me know

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thank you so much for your help I am going to try and work it out now!

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No problem I hope step by step explanation works just fine for you. Let me know if you have any questions and I can go over

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Note that the difference between static friction and kinetic friction is that static friction entails the force required to move the object, and kinetic friction is the force of friction which proportionately increases with the applied force. This entails a "portion" expressed by 1 being equal to 100% and 0.1 equal to 10%. It is impossible to determine the kinetic friction of an object without knowing the actual mass of the object in question. So good luck.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Best part of the physics is that we get to think about normal stupid things in life we don't even bother about. You will start to see how everything you do relates to those fundamental forces especially the force of gravity as you get more affectionate about physics.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But be careful though, physics can become a dangerous obsession where you can't do a simple thing without thinking about the equations and forces involved. I suffered a little from this and decreased my overall work productivity as a result.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh by the way, static friction aside you need to calculate the gravitational potential of the object with regards to its mass as well. This is quite two fold more like three fold complicated question.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thank you so much for your help, I do believe I found the correct answer!

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Great! I am glad

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Be careful with sig figs finally.

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