A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

...

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The answer sheet says the odd integers are 15, 17, and 19. I have no idea whats going on

  2. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    You must NAME the three integers. Do that first.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x = first odd integer?

  4. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Good try, but it is only by luck that it will be odd. How do you REQUIRE it to be odd?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    well

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You don't have to go to that extent. Because they are consecutive odd integers, you know exactly what the difference is between the third one and the first one. Then the question becomes much simpler.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ohh yeah thats true

  8. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    That may be true for this problem, but it is not a general solution to all such problems. Name the three odd integers.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Let the second odd integer be \(x\) and build a fairly simple equation based on the question.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    A general solution is not required for a specific problem.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay im gonna try and figure it out right now

  12. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    A general solution is required for ALL problems. We can worry about esoterica later. If you are in a contest, where speed is of the essence, let's find all the speed-up, short cuts we can. When we are learning to be consistent, correct, and easily followed, please be more deliberate and distinct. Name the three integers.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    would the third integer be 4?

  14. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Does that sound odd to you? What did you name the integers?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no it doesnt

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How much is 3 times the difference between the 3rd and 1st odd integer?

  17. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    ok first know that the sum and difference of two odd integers is even

  18. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ah! Another single-problem solver.

  19. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    now consider three consecutive odd integers 2x+1, 2x+3,2x+5

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hmm

  21. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    now can you solve it ?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah i can but how did you get it? Three times the difference of the third and first odd integer is five less than the second odd integer so do you have to multiply or subtract?

  23. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    what is that mean ?'' single-problem solver ''

  24. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Seriously, if you effectively name the integers, everything everyone is trying to tell you will be seen clearly before your eyes. To bad soha... did the naming for you. It would have been useful to have you come up with that. Keep in mind that it is not the only definition. It could be 2x-1, 2x+1, 2x+3. You just have to keep track of your clear and useful definitions. You were originally going for x,x+2,and x+4. That MIGHT work, but only if you get luck and find a solution where x is odd. With 2x+1, knowing that x is an integer, 2x+1 MUST be odd.

  25. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    yes you can also consider these numbers as well

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah.. uh

  27. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    2x+1 is odd

  28. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    1st odd integer: 2x+1 2nd odd integer: 2x+3 3rd oddineger: 2x+5 Build it from the problem statement.

  29. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    yes

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah i can do that.. but like im so lost on how you guys found the integers

  31. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    We didn't FIND them. We just NAMED them.

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh okay

  33. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    here first know this thing that odd integers are 1,3,5,7..... now these are like 2x+1 here put any value of x you will get odd integer try it

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay got it :)

  35. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    If you KNOW x is an integer, then 2x is an EVEN integer and 2x+1 is an ODD integer. That's all.

  36. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    know you have to consider three consecutive odd integers so you can consider 2x+1,2x+3,2x+5 or 2x-1,2x+1,2x+3

  37. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    another approach

  38. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1441085018113:dw|

  39. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1441085108455:dw|

  40. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    no you can consider these numbers because you don't know what x is

  41. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    you are using answers to make integers huh ...? lol

  42. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    No,see, triciaal is using the magic method. It will only be by luck if x turns out to be odd.

  43. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x is an odd integer to count by odd numbers you are counting by 2's

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah starting to understand now lol

  45. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    You can SAY it is odd, but if your solution produces x = 14 what will you do?

  46. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    but we are discussion the general method right ? so we have to use proper way

  47. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah its general strategy

  48. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but idk

  49. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @tkhunny what magic method? go back to basics count by 2's for the next number

  50. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Asked and answered. You do not KNOW that x will be odd. You have defined ODD or EVEN consecutive integers. There is nothing in your definition that REQUIRES them to be odd.

  51. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    ok so we done now ?

  52. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the question said it was odd

  53. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    agree with @tkhunny

  54. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Your definition didn't.

  55. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Thank you guys for your help, I will eventually figure it out. :)

  56. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    we ca solve questions of math by different methods but we have to use a proper method to solve a general problem

  57. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    np :)

  58. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @glitterythings do you want me to review what I did ?

  59. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ...and I retract my statement where I called @sohailiftikhar a single-problem solver.

  60. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    if you dont mind

  61. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @triciaal

  62. sohailiftikhar
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    @tkhunny :)

  63. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x is an odd integer consecutive means in counting order to count by odd numbers example 1, 3, 5 7 counting by 2's so before x will be (x-2) and after x will be (x +2)

  64. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    next use the information given to set up the equation

  65. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Can i always use that method? but with different information?

  66. tkhunny
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    {sigh} And if you are lucky, x will turn out to be odd. You can always solve with a method that REQUIRES your result to take on the REQUIRED form.

  67. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1441085808490:dw|

  68. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    simplify the equation, solve for x

  69. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    is it clear now?

  70. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah it is

  71. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    great

  72. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thx!

  73. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.