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anonymous

  • one year ago

How would you get d= 7300 m^3 to m^2? An electrolytic tin-plating process gives a coating of 3.0 x10^-5 inches thick. How many square metres can be coated with 1kg of tin, d=7300 kg/m^3...is the full question, please just help me get the m^3 to m^2

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @paki @toxicsugar22 Can either of you help?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @sweetburger can you help?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @abb0t can you help?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @aaronq

  5. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441146852206:dw|

  6. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441146891331:dw|

  7. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    I meant 0.00003 inches for height, which is 7.62e-7 m (conversion done by google cuz i'm not 'murican). This is a volume, not a surface, but it has a fixed height. \(V=l*w*h=l*w*(7.62*10^{-7}~m)\) The volume of tin must be found with the mass and the density. \(\rho=\dfrac{m}{V}\rightarrow V=\dfrac{m}{\rho}=\dfrac{1~kg}{7300~kg/m^3}=0.0001369863013699~m~\approx0.000137~m^3\) \(V=l*w*(7.62*10^{-7}~m)= 0.000137~m^3\) Well make this a square base, so: \(x^2*(7.62*10^{-7}~m)= 0.000137~m^3\) Finally we solve for x and we get one of the sides of our coating.|dw:1441147497222:dw|

  8. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    Actually solving for \(x^2\) gives you the area of the coating, so yeah you can stop there

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    will solving for x^3 give us a m^2 answer?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @aaronq ok, so looking at this, firstly thank you, but why are we finding volume, instead of let's say area? Is it because the coating has a thickness?

  11. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    yes, the thickness indicates that the object has 3 dimensions and has a volume. Solving for \(\sf x^2\) gives you the area

  12. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    The thickness indicates how large the material can coat the area. A thinner coating will give a larger area and viceversa.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Awesome Thanks, @aaronq I got 13.41m^2 Is this correct?!?

  14. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    no problem! sorry, idk my calculator is elsewhere. just divide the volume by the height and that should be it

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok... I did 1.37*10^-4 (volume) / 7.62*10^-7 (height) = 179.79m^4 Then finally took the square root of that and got 13.41m^2

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But, i don't know if that is how the exponents on metres goes??? Sorry to keep asking things, just want to make sure i'm absolutely correct on units (my teacher is strict on units) @aaronq

  17. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    the will cancel out and give you \(m^2\), remember i told you to follow the formula and divide the volume by the height? \(\sf \dfrac{volume}{height}=\dfrac{m^3}{m}=m^2\)

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok but then do you just leave the x^2???

  19. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    So you have \(x^2*(7.62*10^{-7}~m)= 0.000137~m^3\) then just isolate \(x^2\)

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    because if you take the square root of 179.79 m^2 it comes out 13.41 m

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so it would just be 179.79 m^2

  22. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    they're asking you for square meters

  23. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    yeah

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok thanks!

  25. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    ok cool, no problem

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