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anonymous

  • one year ago

Use the mass values of each element to determine the empirical formula of the tin oxide compound. mass of tin: 2.12g mass of oxygen: 4.5g

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @DanJS

  2. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    sorry, i would have to look it up, been a few years since chem, it is the reduiced formula...need to find the mass ratios i think

  3. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    is there more than one oxide of tin mayhbe too

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i dont think so, otherwise there would be the roman numerals right

  5. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    yes, here are a couple examples, seems straight forward

  6. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    https://www.chem.tamu.edu/class/majors/tutorialnotefiles/empirical.htm

  7. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    what is the formula for the tin oxide? tin has more than one oxidation state

  8. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    SnO SnO2 ?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    its SnO

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    also it says tin (II) oxide

  11. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    right that is what it is if SnO , since oxygen is -2 ion charge

  12. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    it just follows example 1 in that link i put above

  13. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    convert both gram masses to moles of each first...

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    im not sure how to do that,

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    do i find it on the periodic table or something ?

  16. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    Look on the periodic table to find the mass of each element...molecular mass

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    118.71 u for tin and 15.9994 u ± 0.0004 u for oxygen

  18. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    that is how many grams of that element are in 1 mole of that element

  19. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    sounds right, i know oxygen is 16

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok, what to do from here

  21. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    so convert each to moles by.... |dw:1441161268321:dw|

  22. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    notice grams X cancels out, it is on top and bottom

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yea

  24. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{ 2.12g~Sn }{ 1}*\frac{ 1~mol~Sn }{ 118.71g~Sn }~~ \approx~~0.0179~mol~~Sn\]

  25. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    remember the number from the table, 118.71 gives you the number of grams of tin per 1 mole... the second fraction used

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so tins molar mass is 0.0179 mol

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  28. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    no, tins molar mass is 118.71 g / mol (on table) 0.0179 mol tin is the same thing as 2.12 g tin that is given, just converted grams of tin to moles of tin

  29. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    in the same way, convert the given grams of oxygen to moles of oxygen

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh ok

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    about 0.2813

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is that correct

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I've gotta hit the sack now but we can continue this later, thanks!

  34. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    yes

  35. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    follow example 1 in here https://www.chem.tamu.edu/class/majors/tutorialnotefiles/empirical.htm already converted to moles...only one step left

  36. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    goodluck

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @DanJS ok im back, the last step is the division correct?

  38. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    oh, yeah i think you just divide by the smallest element value

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and we have to do that for each element

  40. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    0.0179 mol Sn and 0.2813 mol O one sec

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok

  42. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    k

  43. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    yeah i think you just divide both by the smaller, and they should be near whole numbers

  44. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    so 16 oxygen and one tin i guess

  45. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    yeah, 4.5 grams of a gas is a bunch compared to 2.12g of tin

  46. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok, so theres 16 oxygen and 1 tin, how does this relate to the empirical formula of tin oxide

  47. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    idk, i would look more into it, i just went through it with you and looked it up

  48. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    Empirical Formula - A formula that gives the simplest whole-number ratio of atoms in a compound. i'm not very confident in that answer though, it may be right, not sure

  49. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    SnO16 ...looks strange

  50. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    i would re-ask the question in a fresh thread and maybe someone can do it for sure

  51. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok thanks for your time

  52. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    welcome, i remember a few chem things pretty good from the 2 semesters i had to take

  53. DanJS
    • one year ago
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    empirical formula, not so much, never used again

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